16 Weeks Pregnant

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16 weeks pregnant

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Your Body

Who knew pregnancy could affect even your nose? It’s true: Many women that are 16 weeks pregnant experience nasal congestion and nosebleeds at this stage of the game. They’re caused by pregnancy hormones and increasing blood flow, which... Read more

Your Baby

By this week, your baby’s backbone is stronger so she can work on straightening her neck, and holding her head more erect -- rather than rounded down, as it was before. Her skeletal and nervous systems continue to develop, allowing her to move... Read more

Your Life Right Now

Feeling a little short of breath? Around this time, a simple trek across the parking lot -- or up the stairs in your house -- may leave you winded. Even though you may not be carrying that much more weight around, changes in breathing are common.... Read more

Moms Like Me / I Wish I Had Known

"I wish someone had told me to appreciate my first pregnancy more. The second time around, you’re so preoccupied with your first child, it's hard to do much of anything, let alone take good care of yourself."... Read more

16 Weeks Pregnant: Your Body

Who knew pregnancy could affect even your nose? It’s true: Many women that are 16 weeks pregnant experience nasal congestion and nosebleeds at this stage of the game. They’re caused by pregnancy hormones and increasing blood flow, which in turn can make the mucous membranes in your nose swell up. And all of a sudden you may feel perpetually stuffy and can be more prone to nosebleeds. With more blood putting pressure around the nasal area, it may not take much -- say, a good blow into a tissue -- to tear them and cause a gusher. Both of these things are more occasional annoyances than anything else. But if congestion or bleeds are frequent enough that they really bug you, be sure to consult your doctor before you run out to the drug store for something to ease your nose woes. Even some of the seemingly innocent OTC remedies may be off limits for pregnant women. Another annoying symptom you may be experiencing is heartburn. Thanks to pregnancy hormones, the digestive slowdown that occurs can make muscles more relaxed and cause digestive acids to back up into your esophagus and ouch, burn, burn, burn in your chest. In addition (especially as you grow bigger) your enlarging uterus can crowd the abdomen, pushing stomach acids upwards. Again, talk to your health care pro about how best to treat your heartburn. But eating small, frequent meals, avoiding spicy or super acidic foods, being active and sitting and sleeping with your upper body propped up a bit can all help as well as avoiding lying down for a few hours after eating. And if you’re suffering, get your doc’s ok to start stashing antacids everywhere -- your desk at work, the glove compartment, your purse -- so you’re never caught without.

16 Weeks Pregnant: Your Baby

By this week, your baby’s backbone is stronger so she can work on straightening her neck, and holding her head more erect -- rather than rounded down, as it was before. Her skeletal and nervous systems continue to develop, allowing her to move in a coordinated fashion. The eyes, which were spaced wide when they first began developing, have migrated closer to the front of her face. And though her eyelids are sealed shut, her eyes can make small side to side movements and she perceives some light. Around this time, your baby may also start getting hiccups. You won’t hear them -- since she’s breathing amniotic fluid, not air -- but don’t worry, they don’t bother her. Like thumb sucking, this is another cute event you can spot on an ultrasound, if the timing is right.

Your Life Right Now

Feeling a little short of breath? Around this time, a simple trek across the parking lot -- or up the stairs in your house -- may leave you winded. Even though you may not be carrying that much more weight around, changes in breathing are common. According to the Mayo Clinic Guide to a Healthy Pregnancy , nearly two-thirds of moms-to-be experience shortness of breath. What’s behind all the huffing and puffing? For one thing your expanding uterus is pushing up against your diaphragm enough to alter your breathing.  Also at this stage of your pregnancy, lung capacity increases allow you to inhale and exhale a whopping 30 to 40 percent more in order to let you carry  additional life-supporting oxygen into your blood (and, ultimately, to your baby) and remove more carbon dioxide than usual. It’s a natural, genius thing your body does! But in the process, your respiratory system has to readjust as the depth and frequency of your breathing increases -- causing that shortness of breath. Just take it slow! It’s nothing to fret about.

Moms Like Me / I Wish I Had Known

"I wish someone had told me to appreciate my first pregnancy more. The second time around, you’re so preoccupied with your first child, it's hard to do much of anything, let alone take good care of yourself." --hjminkus115

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When someone tells you: “It’s OK. You’re eating for two. Have that 8th piece of cake." -- Don't do it!  They don't have to lose the weight and they’re secretly hoping to see you blow up to whale-like proportions. --mom2jadenplus1

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