30 Weeks Pregnant

Pregnancy

Cue the Jaws music. It's coming, it's coming -- that stranger's hand, headed straight for your belly. You might want to smack it away or scream out in a hormonal rage (both fine, in case you're wondering). Better yet, use these quick-thinking quips to put that bump-touching bandit in her place.

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Nursery Design

From kid-centric wallpaper to stripes on the ceiling, we talked to our favorite interior designers and experts to uncover the biggest trends in nursery decor and kids' room decor for 2013. Get inspired!

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Did You Know?
10¾ inches

Height of your baby

3 pounds

Weight of your baby

honeydew melon
30 weeks pregnant

Size of your baby

What’s new this week?
Your Body

Oh, so there’s the swelling you’ve been hearing about (and yes, this is where some pregnant women develop the lovely “cankles” when any ankle definition all but disappears). By this stage in pregnancy, about 75... Read more

Your Baby

Grow, baby, grow! Your baby continues to put on weight at a steady pace this week. In fact, between now and week 37 she’ll gain about a half a pound per week! As your baby practices her breathing movements, you may notice bouts of baby... Read more

Your Life Right Now

One of the “what ifs” that rattle around in many pregnant women’s brains is the fear of getting group B streptococcus (GBS). It is the most common cause of blood infection and meningitis in newborns -- and between 10 and 30 percent... Read more

Moms Like Me / I Wish I Had Known

"If you’re considering daycare after your baby is born, there are questions you’ll want to ask. I’d want to know about their sick policy. When is a child sent home and made to stay home? Is a sick child separated in any way... Read more

30 Weeks Pregnant: Your Body

Oh, so there’s the swelling you’ve been hearing about (and yes, this is where some pregnant women develop the lovely “cankles” when any ankle definition all but disappears). By this stage in pregnancy, about 75 percent of pregnant women develop mild edema -- and you may be one of them. At 30 weeks pregnant, it’s more common on warm days, or if you've been on your feet a lot. While mild swelling is normal, it’s important to call your practitioner if your hands or face begin to swell, if the puffiness , or if it’s accompanied by a sudden weight gain or a consistently elevated blood pressure -- possible signs of preeclampsia. Your doctor or midwife will check your blood pressure, the degree of swelling and may run a quick test to see if there is protein in your urine. Preeclampsia affects approximately 5 percent of pregnant women. Previous studies indicated that vitamins C and E played a role in preventing preeclampsia, but more recent research from the National Institutes of Health suggests that they don’t prevent the condition. There are however studies that find a link between calcium deficiency and preeclampsia and suggesting that calcium supplementation may reduce the risk.

30 Weeks Pregnant: Your Baby

Grow, baby, grow! Your baby continues to put on weight at a steady pace this week. In fact, between now and week 37 she’ll gain about a half a pound per week! As your baby practices her breathing movements, you may notice bouts of baby hiccups. At this point, she’s about 17 inches long, all stretched out. Can you believe all that fits inside that comparatively small-looking belly of yours?

Your Life Right Now

One of the “what ifs” that rattle around in many pregnant women’s brains is the fear of getting group B streptococcus (GBS). It is the most common cause of blood infection and meningitis in newborns -- and between 10 and 30 percent of pregnant women carry this bacteria within the vagina and rectum. Most of the time, the bacteria does not cause any symptoms in the pregnant woman and she has no clue it’s there. But babies that are exposed to group B strep  -- during labor and delivery -- can develop a potentially life-threatening lung, blood or brain infection, so if a woman tests positive doctors often treat with antibiotics during labor, for prevention and protection. (Occasionally babies can develop late onset GB, occurring seven days or so after delivery, in which they are exposed either during delivery or postpartum via contact with a carrier. Late onset GB can lead to conditions like meningitis or pneumonia.)  That’s why it’s recommended that all pregnant women be screened for GBS between their 35th and 37th week of pregnancy -- so if your doc hasn’t mentioned it yet, you might want to ask about scheduling it. The screen is quick (a simple swab of the vagina and rectum) and can put yet one more fear to rest.

Moms Like Me / I Wish I Had Known

"If you’re considering daycare after your baby is born, there are questions you’ll want to ask. I’d want to know about their sick policy. When is a child sent home and made to stay home? Is a sick child separated in any way from the other kids until the parent comes to get him? How do they handle emergencies? What happens if they have to call 911 for a child? (I ask because it happened at my son’s old daycare when a child developed a 105-degree fever and was somewhat unresponsive.) If your baby is at a home daycare and there are no other adults present, how would that situation be handled?" --twolittlemen2love

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I miss being able to pass a bathroom without having to use it, or for that matter, being able to say the words "pee" "bathroom" or any other similar phrase without having to pee. --capsaddy85

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