Diphtheria, Tetanus, and Pertussis vaccines

3. What are the risks from these vaccines?

  • As with any medicine, vaccines carry a small risk of serious harm, such as a severe allergic reaction or even death.
  • If there are reactions. they usually start within 3 days and don't last long.
  • Most people have no serious reactions from these vaccines.

Possible reactions to these vaccines:
Mild reactions (common)

  • Sore arm or leg
  • Fussy
  • Tired
  • Fever
  • Less appetite
  • Vomiting

Mild reactions are much less likely after DTaP than after DTP.

Moderate to serious reactions (uncommon)
Moderate to serious reactions have been uncommon with DTP vaccine:

  • Non-stop crying (3 hours or more) . . . . . . . . . . 100 of every 10,000 doses
  • Fever of 105 or higher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 of every 10,000 doses
  • Seizure (jerking or staring) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 of every 10,000 doses
  • Child becomes limp, pale, less alert . . . . . . . . . . 6 of every 10,000 doses

With DTaP vaccine, these reactions are much less likely to happen.

4. When should my child get vaccinated

Most children should get a dose at these ages:

  • two months
  • four months
  • six months
  • 12 to 18 months
  • four to six years

At 11-12 years of age and every 10 years after that you should get a booster to prevent diphtheria and tetanus.

Like this? Want more?
preview
Connect with Us
Follow Our Pins

Yummy recipes, DIY projects, home decor, fashion and more curated by iVillage staffers.

Follow Our Tweets

The very dirty truth about fashion internships... DUN DUN @srslytheshow http://t.co/wfewf

On Instagram

Behind-the-scenes pics from iVillage.

Best of the Web