Has anyone ever used Madison Reed color?

Avatar for cupcakebabe
iVillage Member
Registered: 11-09-2011
Has anyone ever used Madison Reed color?
6
Wed, 08-27-2014 - 3:06pm

I'm trying to cut back on my "extras" and am thinking of going back to coloring my own hair, since I hardly ever get the color I really want anyway. It's $25 a box if you do it via the program - compared to $60-$70 at the salon, that's a big savings. Anyway, just wondering if anyone has used it before and if it's as great as it seems. Reviews seem positive (except for one color which isn't a color I'd go with anyway). 

Avatar for sabrtooth
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-03-1999
Wed, 08-27-2014 - 8:27pm

Never used that.  I began coloring my hair on my 18th birthday, and I'm now 62.  I color my hair every 6 to 8 weeks.  I've used Excellence, Preference, and Nice and Easy  which is $4.99 to $8.99 per box,  for 75% of that time.  The rest of the time, I bought even CHEAPER hair color, from Sally Beauty supply, along with giant bottles of 20% volune peroxide developer, and mixed my own color.  I've never had an allergic reaction, and my hair has never broken off, altho it has, occasionally, been darker than I liked.  As long as you don't strip or bleach your hair, cheap is fine.  Cheap is EXACTLY what they use in salons.  All you are really paying for, is the service.

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-07-1999
Thu, 08-28-2014 - 7:47am

Sabr,

With all due respect, I have been a hairdresser for 20 years, and I also instruct at our local vocational school.  At your age of 62 (if you have been doing your hair yourself for 44 years), then you really have no idea what type of color salons use now a days.  40 years ago most salons used what you will find at Sally's.  I do not know any professionl stylist that still purchases their color from Sally's.  We purchase from professional stores that DO NOT sell to the public.  My color is not CHEAP!  Neither is my time or my education.  Do you know why your color has turned out darker than you like?  There's many reasons for why that happens, and my education knows how to prevent that.  I average approximately 1-2k on my education every year (which is required for my 3 licenses that I carry).  Those who visit the salon do not just pay for service.  Do you really even have an idea of how hairdressers are paid?  In my case, I am an independent  contractor.  I average about 15 hours a week (I chose to be home raising my children) in the salon making about $400 gross.  My deductions are as followed, $400-$100 (for rent)-$50 (supplies)=$250-20%(taxes)=$200/15hours=$13hr.  If you ask anyone that sees a professional stylist regularly, they will llikely tell you that their stylist is much more than "someone who does their hair."  I have been through anything you can think of with my clients, and some days the emotional weight that I carry around with me (froms listening to my clients), makes me feel like an underpaid shrink.  Please do not try to discredit what hairdressers do!  I do what I do because, I love what I do, not for the piddly amount of money I make.

I cosmetically and psychologically transform self images of fellow human beings....What do you do?   Dr. Lew

Avatar for sabrtooth
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-03-1999
Thu, 08-28-2014 - 9:44am

I was not, in any way, disparaging hairdressers.  I do understand the education that goes into what you do.  I have been fortunate enough to have several friends who were hairdressers.  And so I do know, that even if the products you buy cost $20 per client, and they do NOT, then the bulk of the $70+ that is paid for a dye job in a salon, is for YOUR SERVICE.  That service includes your education, and  expertise.  As for the product itself, there is not a lot of difference between what's in a box of Preference, and what YOU buy.  The difference is in the hairdresser's understanding of how those products, and ancillary products like drabbers, etc, are used.

That being said, the point of the original post was how to save money on haircoloring.  It is very cost effective to color one's hair at home, and anyone with a modicum of intelligence, and manual dexterity, can do a servicable job.

Community Leader
Registered: 08-25-2006
Thu, 08-28-2014 - 5:54pm

Hi Olivia, I have never heard of Madison Reed?  

For financial reasons, I started coloring my own hair about 10 years ago.  It took some trial and error to find the ONE that I really liked.  Of course, played around again a few years later, but went back to the ONE.  

Personally, I like Loreal's Ferria.  It has another product you put in the bottle that gives your hair the illusion of a little shine and highlights.  Not flat like some of the other kinds I tried.  Of course, it is personal preference.  I also like Ferria because it comes with enough product to do my roots and comb through (although I was told not to do that any longer, and it isn't necessary like it says on the instructions).  I have super thick hair, so something to keep in mind.  Not uncommon to need two boxes if you are doing all over and have long and/or thick hair.  

On a side note: I did play around trying to do highlights, but it was harder than I thought.  I ended up with  new look, but not the one I intended.  It was fine, no harm, but just a heads up on that.  

I don't mind doing my own hair at all.  I do miss the pampering time of the salon but the cost was just not feasable for me any longer.  

Lastly, do be careful of one thing.  I accidently (store was out of my normal color) got a highlift and I ended up with an ashy light brown that did not look good on me.  It was not the ordinary Number (like 69 or 72) it had a letter in it.  So watch for that kind of stuff.  Read the box.

Good luck!

Serenity CL making a marriage work

Serenity
iVillage Member
Registered: 11-07-1999
Fri, 08-29-2014 - 7:35am

Sabr,

The color I use is $10.80 per tube (2oz).  Once you factor in developer, foils, and gloves......$20 is very realistic :)  I'm sorry, but unless you have studied the chemical make up of hair color, then you really do not know what the similarities or differences of hair color are.  There's a reason grocery store color is cheap; the Chemicals!  And from what I understood of the original post, she was inquiring about the color line, the price was a small blip of info.  And lets compare prices, shall we?  The Madison color(which the op was seeking info on) is $25. per box.  A starndard box of grocery store color comes with 4 oz mixed.  Unless the op has a minimal amount of hair, she will likely need more than one box.  I have a shoulder length bob, but I have a lot of hair.  It takes 7-8 oz of color to THOROUGHLY saturate my hair, to ensure no missed spots.  So it would cost me $50. to buy the product she is inquiring about.  I charge $65.-$75 (longer hair is extra to cover the extra product) for a color and cut, which also includes the finish.  By the time she pays for a hair cut, she is at $65.  Why not save yourself the possible headache, and get it professionally done?  If your hair is short, and you do not change your hair color, then yes, coloring your hair at home can be cost effective for some, but those with longer hair, or who do change their color a lot, usually run in to problems at some point.  The last corrective color, I did took 6 hours to fix, and I charged the gal $225.00.  She tried to go from blonde to dark brown, then hated how dark and greenish is was, and tried to unsuccessfully lighten it it back up.  Artificial color WILL NOT lighten artificial color and any time you darken from blonde, you have to add in the undertones that were removed during the prior lightening.  I typically start at $50 an hour for corrective color, rather than try to charge per each service.  $200 is not very cost effective, huh?

Avatar for demecafe
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-08-2008
Wed, 09-03-2014 - 2:07pm

I just got my first shipment yesterday. I have my hair appointment on Sunday for a cut, and then I'll be dying it on Monday. I'm used to dying at home, so I'm excited to try it this way (it has two pairs of gloves, barrier cream, shampoo, conditioner, the color, and a cap to keep the color on the head. I am super excited about the cap. I always make a mess somehow). I'm at the point where I need all over color so coloring at home is a no brainer. However, I do recommend going to the salon for big changes. Refreshing at home is one thing, but going blonde to black or the reverse obviously needs someone who really knows how colors react. Good luck to you! 


demecafe