Read-a-Thon Reviews

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-24-2002
Read-a-Thon Reviews
35
Sat, 06-15-2013 - 11:05am

The read-a-thon starts today! Post your read-a-thon reviews in this thread. If you have trouble posting, trying giong through this link: http://www.ivillage.com/user/sign-in

If you can NOT post and you have reviews, please email me at brendaluvschance@yahoo.com , and I will post them for you. 

Remember to post the review number before each book reviewed, you may post multiple books in one post.

Happy Reading!!!

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Avatar for zions_daughter
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-18-2001
Sun, 06-16-2013 - 11:33pm

#1 :)

Avempartha by Michael J. Sullivan

This was a quick read, though I have to admit I did skim a little when the action moved to the religious leaders of this fantasy world. I wasn't a big fan of them and their devious ways! Still loved the two main characters from the first book (The Crown Conspiracy) and their adventure was a good one.

THE SECRET IS IN THE TOWER. THE PROBLEM IS THE BEAST. THE ANSWER IS TWO THIEVES. When a destitute young woman hires Royce and Hadrian to help save her remote village from nocturnal attacks, they are once more drawn into the schemes of the wizard Esrahaddon. While Royce struggles to breech the secrets of an ancient elven tower, Hadrian attempts to rally the villagers to defend themselves against the unseen killer. Once more, what begins with the simple theft of a sword places the two thieves at the center of a firestorm -- but this time the outcome could change the future of Elan.

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-24-2002
Tue, 06-18-2013 - 1:10am

Review #1 Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH


This was one of my favorite books as a kid. I really enjoyed reading it this time. Great way to start the read-a-thon!!!

Amazon.com Review

There's something very strange about the rats living under the rosebush at the Fitzgibbon farm. But Mrs. Frisby, a widowed mouse with a sick child, is in dire straits and must turn to these exceptional creatures for assistance. Soon she finds herself flying on the back of a crow, slipping sleeping powder into a ferocious cat's dinner dish, and helping 108 brilliant, laboratory-enhanced rats escape to a utopian civilization of their own design, no longer to live "on the edge of somebody else's, like fleas on a dog's back." This unusual novel, winner of the Newbery Medal (among a host of other accolades) snags the reader on page one and reels in steadily all the way through to the exhilarating conclusion. Robert O'Brien has created a small but complete world in which a mother's concern for her son overpowers her fear of all her natural enemies and allows her to make some extraordinary discoveries along the way. O'Brien's incredible tale, along with Zena Bernstein's appealing ink drawings, ensures that readers will never again look at alley rats and field mice in the same way.

Community Leader
Registered: 05-11-1999
Thu, 06-20-2013 - 9:48am

Review #1 

Someday, Someday, Maybe by Lauren Graham

Good read. There is a little bit of language...seems to have been in the past couple of books I have read...back to books without it.....

Summary: 
It's January 1995, and Franny Banks has just six months left of the three-year deadline she set for herself when she came to New York, dreaming of Broadway and doing "important" work. But all she has to show for her efforts so far is a part in an ad for ugly Christmas sweaters, and a gig waiting tables at a comedy club. Her roommates, her best friend Jane, and Dan, an aspiring sci-fi writer, are supportive, yet Franny knows a two-person fan club doesn't exactly count as success. Everyone tells her she needs a backup plan, and though she can almost picture moving back home and settling down with her perfectly nice ex-boyfriend, she's not ready to give up on her goal of having a career like her idols Diane Keaton and Meryl Streep. Not just yet. But while she dreams of filling their shoes, in the meantime, she'd happily settle for a speaking part in almost anything and finding a hair product combination that works.

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Avatar for zions_daughter
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-18-2001
Thu, 06-20-2013 - 9:11pm

#2

The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making (Catherynne M. Valente)

This was a great book! The storytelling style and characters reminded me of The Neverending Story (the novel, that is) and two childhood favourite movies: "Labyrinth" and "Return to Oz." (For the record, I do like the first "Neverending Story" movie a lot, but the book is quite different and I think Valente achieves the same level of brilliance, hence the book comparison.)

I loved discovering Valente's Fairyland through September's eyes and the plot contained plenty of adventures to enjoy. The ending was bittersweet, though - I wasn't ready to leave the story, yet I wanted things sufficiently wrapped up. Valente leaves room for a sequel (more than one, in fact) so I'm going to have to track down another tale to see what happens next in Fairyland!

Twelve-year-old September lives in Omaha, and used to have an ordinary life, until her father went to war and her mother went to work. One day, September is met at her kitchen window by a Green Wind (taking the form of a gentleman in a green jacket), who invites her on an adventure, implying that her help is needed in Fairyland. The new Marquess is unpredictable and fickle, and also not much older than September. Only September can retrieve a talisman the Marquess wants from the enchanted woods, and if she doesn't... then the Marquess will make life impossible for the inhabitants of Fairyland. September is already making new friends, including a book-loving Wyvern and a mysterious boy named Saturday.

Community Leader
Registered: 05-11-1999
Sun, 06-23-2013 - 7:20am
Review #2 The Color of Your Skin Ain't the Color of Your Heart by Michael Phillips Great read! I can't wait to read the final book in the series! Book 3 of bestselling Shenandoah Sisters. Katie, the daughter of a plantation owner, and Mayme, the daughter of a slave, find themselves with only each other after the Civil War. They devise a scheme to keep Katie’s plantation going, disguising the fact they are all alone. Now in book three, the girls face new threats to their security. A long-lost uncle appears and then disappears as suddenly, taking their secret with them. Then a flood threatens to destroy the remaining cotton crop they need to save the plantation from foreclosure. Filled with fascinating period details, challenging questions of faith, and heartwarming friendship, this series has all the elements historical fiction fans love.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 10-24-2002
Tue, 06-25-2013 - 6:59pm

Review #2 Paper Moon : Book One of The Moonstruck Series by  Linda Windsor

This book was just ok, it took me forever to read it, so now I'm behind a little!! :)

Book Descriptions:

Dear Reader, ready for a rollicking good romance? Then hang tight. You're about to meet my latest character, Caroline Spencer--a hilarious single mom who's up for almost any adventure, including chaperoning a bunch of boisterous teenagers on their class trip to Mexico!

What Caroline's not up for is Blaine Madison-a fellow chaperone and single parent. Now trust me, honey, when I say this guy is tall, dark, and take-you-breath-away. But just as our leading lady is falling in love, two of the teen-agers get caught up in an international smuggling ring. One is Blaine's daughter-and the other one is Caroline's.

Kids will be kids, crooks will be crooks, and hearts will be hearts, but love trumps all.

Enjoy the lift of laugher, Linda Windsor

Avatar for zions_daughter
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-18-2001
Tue, 06-25-2013 - 8:42pm

#3

Flyte (Angie Sage)

I loved this second book of the Septimus Heap series. Lots of fun and adventure with enough conflict to keep things from getting tedious. ;) Looking forward to the next one!

It’s been a year since Septimus Heap discovered his real family and true calling to be a wizard. As Apprentice to Extra Ordinary Wizard Marcia Overstrand, he is learning the fine arts of Conjurations, Charms, and other Magyk, while Jenna is adapting to life as the Princess and enjoying the freedom of the Castle.

But there is something sinister at work. Marcia is constantly trailed by a menacing Darke Shadow, and Septimus’s brother Simon seems bent on a revenge no one understands. Why is the Darke Magyk still lingering?

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-06-1999
Wed, 06-26-2013 - 5:36pm

#1  "The Christmas Quilt"  by Jennifer Chiaverini

This is the second book that I have read by this author.  They are good and seems to leave the reader with a warm fuzzy feeling.

Here is the information on the book from Barnes and Noble:

Overview

 

When Christmas Eve comes to Elm Creek Manor, the tenor of the holiday is far from certain. Sylvia Bergstrom Compson, the Master Quilter, has her own reasons for preferring a quiet, even subdued, Christmas. Her young friend Sarah McClure, however, takes the opposite view and decides to deck the halls brightly. As she explores the trunks packed with Bergstrom family decorations that haven't been touched in more than fifty years, Sarah discovers a curious Christmas quilt. Begun in seasonal fabrics and patterns, the quilt remains unfinished.

 

Sylvia reveals that the handiwork spans several generations and a quartet of Bergstrom quilters — her great aunt, her mother, her sister, and herself. As she examines the array of quilt blocks each family member contributed but never completed, memories of Christmases past emerge.

 

At Elm Creek Manor, Christmas began as a celebration of simple virtues — joy and hope buoyed by the spirit of giving. As each successive generation of Bergstroms lived through its unique trials — the antebellum era, the Great Depression, World War II — tradition offered sustenance even during the most difficult times. For Sylvia, who is coping with the modern problem of family dispersed, estranged, or even forgotten, reconciliation with her personal history may prove as elusive as piecing the Christmas Quilt.

 

Elm Creek Manor is full of secrets, from a Christmas tree with unusual properties to the sublime Bergstrom strudel recipe. Sylvia's tales at first seem to inform her family legacy but ultimately illuminate far more, from the importance of women's art to its place in commemorating our shared experience, at Christmastime and in every season.

 

Tammy

 

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iVillage Member
Registered: 10-06-1999
Wed, 06-26-2013 - 5:40pm

#2  "Everywhere That Mary Went"  by Lisa Scottoline.

For me this was a very quick read.  I did not want to put it down because I wanted to know who?  I was surprised the who that was revealed at the end of the book. 

Here is the information on the book from Barnes and Noble:

Overview

 

Mary DiNunzio is trying to make partner in her cutthroat Philadelphia law firm. She's too busy to worry about the crank phone calls that she's been getting—until they fall into a sinister pattern. Mary can't shake the sensation that someone is watching her. Following her every move. Then the shadowboxing turns deadly, and she has to fight for something a lot more important than a partnership—her life.

 

Tammy

 

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Community Leader
Registered: 05-11-1999
Thu, 06-27-2013 - 12:13pm

Review #3   Round Robin by Jennifer Chiaverini

I am enjoying this series. Very endearing and heartwarming.

The sequel to her acclaimed debut novel, Jennifer Chiaverini'sRound Robinis a poignant tale of friendship and loyalty.

The Elm Creek Quilters have begun a Round Robin quilt, created by sewing concentric patchwork borders to a central block, as a gift for their beloved fellow quilter Sylvia Compson. But even as the quilt is passed from friend to friend, its eloquent beauty increasing with every stitch, the threads of their happiness begin to unravel. As each woman confronts a personal crisis, a painful truth, or a life-changing choice, the quilt serves as a symbol of the complex and enduring bonds between mothers and daughters, sisters and friends.


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