Ron Williamson. God Save Us!

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-15-2004
Ron Williamson. God Save Us!
2
Tue, 10-23-2012 - 8:33pm

The paucity of words, here, on this wordy site, prompts me to add my woeful, doleful, comments this late hour. There was/is/used to be, a prompt to discuss our latest reading matter?  Mine, right now, is a talking book "THE INNOCCENT MAN" by John Grisham, about the scandalous/inhuman treatment of Ron Wilkinson, A man convicted of murder In ADA, Oaklahoma, a crime, he patently did not commit.  This book made me aware of the unjust procedures in the different states of the "good old USA".  To say that I was amazed at the treatment of this guy, who spent so many years on "DEATH ROW" and was only relieved at the last moment is an understatement, I am even further amazed that no action was taken against the law officers that procured his conviction, when they so blatently conjured his conviction, or the judges that convened in such deception and they are active, even now.  GOD SAVE US.







 

 

Avatar for cmbren
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-22-2000
Wed, 10-24-2012 - 12:52pm

Oddly enough, I have been on the waiting list for the Kindle version of this book, having somehow missed it earlier. I'm a big fan of John Grisham's legal fictions and quite eager to read his first nonfiction work. The library just informed me I'm next in line for the edition, so I can only hope the individual reading it now is a swift reader.

Not having yet read this book, I cannot comment on this particular case, but I will acknowledge that our justice system in the US can be extremely uneven. It works better in theory -- innocent until proven guilty, with provisions for appeals being a given -- but often plays out corrupt when factoring in the human element of actual application. Officials and politicians looking to further their careers by "solving" a heinous crime; media focused on trying a case in the the public eye... perceptions are often skewered then presented as fact by both sides. I do feel we need to hold these individuals accountable for their actions, most especially when there is proof that they have knowingly manipulated evidence and/or testimony to serve their purpose. That type of action is reprehensible and totally contradictory to justice being served.

Ok, I'm off my soap box for now; it seems you found one of my hot buttons, Ray! My only personal experience with our court systems was the trial and conviction of my brother's killer; the system served us well that day. Justice, to me, is about the guilty being held accountable for their actions, not just closing a case for the sake of someone's career.

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-15-2004
Thu, 10-25-2012 - 7:11am

I was deeply incensed by this case Bren.  It reminds me of lots of American films in which small town sheriffs (most always portrayed as baddies, I wonder why?) are obsessed with their power over the, sometimes innocent unfortunates, who have incurred their displeasure.

In real life however, the question of capital punishment is a hard one to find an answer to, especially with cases such as this one.

I was surprised to read your views on the subject, even more so as to your own very personal involvement in your brothers case.

Thank you so much for your input.