What are you reading/ have you read July 13-19?

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-11-2008
What are you reading/ have you read July 13-19?
5
Fri, 07-18-2014 - 9:36am

Tell us what you have read and what you are reading this week.

What's one book you recommend that you've read this summer or this year? And please tell us why.

Julia

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-11-2008

This week I've read Monument 14: Savage Drift by Emmy Laybourne

and Under My Skin: Wildings #1 by Charles de Lint.

I'm currently reading Sunrise by Mike Mullin.

If you are Canadian and you've never read Charles de Lint I recommend Under My Skin. I'm an American, I had to have an independent bookstore request Under My Skin from Canada and pay extra for shipping. I love Charles de Lint, so that's not a big deal to me, but if you've never read him, it may be a barrier.

The Harlem Hellfighters by Max Brooks, illustrated by Canaan White 257 pages 7/6/14 published 2014

I bought this book because I wanted to know more about the 369th Regiment in World War I, they called themselves the Black Rattlers. (And because it is by Max Brooks, who wrote World War Z.) It was the Germans who called them the Harlem Hellfighters. American brass shuttled them to the side, barely trained them, had them working as stevedores. They weren't even given rifles; they had to send letters to gun manufacturers, saying they were a gun club, because they were making guns for gun clubs before they were supplying them to black troops in the US Army...

It was the French who actually wanted them fighting with them. “We spent 191 days in combat. Longer than any unit, white or black. In all that time we never lost a trench to the enemy… or a man to capture. We became one of the most decorated units, …black or white… in the entire expeditionary forces.” (225-227) Recommended by Jackie Callahan at The Golden Notebook on WAMC. I bought it from the Book House 7/6/14 for $16.95.

Julia

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-28-2000

Since I last posted, I've read Diary of the Fall by Michel Laub, one of the strangest Holocaust-themed novels I've ever read. It describes the effect of being in ving Auschwitz  on the furvivor, his son, and his grandson. I recommend this to anyone interested in this type of literature.

Next I read Starburst by Frederik Pohl, which I liked very much; The Door to December by Dean Koontz, which was very fast-paced and held my interest but isn't one of my favourite Koontz novels, and Herman Wouk's A Hole in Texas, which I found hard to put down. When I heard about Nadine Gordimer's death last week, I found her 2012 novel No Time Like the Present at the library, and I'm reading it now. Her writing style is a bit unusual, but I've read several of her short stories and Burger's Daughter so I'm familiar with it.

As far as receomminding a favourite book for the entire year or summer, I'll have to think about that and get back to you.

I like deLint's urban fantasy but I can't read too much in that genre at one time. I like to switch genres around any, otherwise everything seems to sound the same and get stale.

Happy reading!

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-13-2008

 I just going to start Black Diamond by Martin Walker. I think that the first book in the series, Bruno, Chief of Police is the only book that I've recommended and passed along to a friend this summer. It is a delightful police procedural mystery series set in St. Denis, France. It reminds me of Louise Penny's, Inspector Gamache series of which we are both fans. It has quirky characters, rural France, great wine and food references.


 Kathie

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-13-2008
Fri, 07-25-2014 - 3:41pm

 I'm still having trouble signing in. It should would be nice if things got fixed. I'm reading The Crowded Grave by Martin Walker.

 

 Kathie

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-11-2008

I've not changed the week, since it's nearly over.

Since Under My Skin by Charles de Lint and Sunrise by Mike Mullin, both are YA, by the way. 

I've read:

  • “A Midsummer Night’s Dream: The Thirty Minute Shakespeare” by William Shakespeare abridged & edited by Nick Newlin
  • Over My Head: Wildings Book 2 by Charles de Lint
  • Landline by Rainbow Rowell
  • The Divide: American Injustice in the Age of the Wealth Gap by Matt Taibbi

And I'm currently reading the beautifully illustrated MG novel for kids & their parents Seven Wild Sisters by Charles de Lint. This novel was published in February, so my local independent bookstore had a copy, so I didn't have to pay for shipping. What's great about de Lint's novels and short stories and eveything he writes, is that he writes about genuinely good people, which makes me want to be a better person. 

(Taibbi writes about some real, well, jerks, imaging an angrier, more profane word here, wouldn't be wrong. So having another de Lint novel to turn to is a balm.)

Julia