Junk food makes you lazy

Avatar for cmkarla
Administrator
Registered: 01-03-2001
Junk food makes you lazy
9
Wed, 04-09-2014 - 9:08am

According to the LA Times, a new study suggests that junk food can make you obese which causes you to be lazy. "In a study published in the journal Physiology & Behavior, researchers at UCLA found that rats fed a diet low in fat but high in simple sugars and refined flour were not only more obese than rats that had a better diet, but also less willing to work for a reward." READ MORE

Hmmm, your thoughts?

Karla
Community ModeratoriVillage.com

Community Leader
Registered: 04-05-2002
Wed, 04-09-2014 - 9:45am

I wonder how much money they waste on obvious studies like this!  Never mind the diet, strap 100 lbs of deadweight on you and see how much you feel like moving.  Having too much bodyfat makes you not want to move. Now, add on muscle weight and you'll feel like moving more.  A more accurate study would be

1) people (rats are meaningless, we're not they) at healthy body weights, ones eating all simple sugars but controlled calories so weight isn't gained vs ones eating a healthful diet

2) people who are overweight but overeating healthful foods and exercising vs people who are healthy weight who are eating healthful foods and exercising.

Did they need a study to show that eating junk, becoming obese, especially as obese as those rats became, makes you less likely to move???






Avatar for cmkarla
Administrator
Registered: 01-03-2001
Wed, 04-09-2014 - 12:05pm

It does make you wonder what exactly was the purpose of the study doesn't it. I once worked with a personal trainer that liked to inspire people to eat healthier and try harder by giving something to really think about.
She had me do a workout one day carrying a 45lb plate. I couldn't do half the things she wanted me to do and most were what I would have normally thought very simple and easy. There's no way I could have done anything with an extra 100+ lbs.

Karla
Community ModeratoriVillage.com

Community Leader
Registered: 07-26-1999
Wed, 04-09-2014 - 12:34pm
That was my first thought Jean, what is the point of this study, and isn't the answer already pretty obvious?? Sometimes it amazes me what money they waste on stupid studies...
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Avatar for elc11
Community Leader
Registered: 06-16-1998
Wed, 04-09-2014 - 4:28pm

I read the article and came away with a different take....that the obesity wasn't what was causing the laziness, it was something in the brain chemistry due to the diet. The author said that both sets of rats had the same energy level, and all they needed to do was to press a lever for the reward---not like it was too hard because they were so fat.

To me it translates to humans regarding *not all calories are the same*. Weight control is often said to be a matter of calories consumed vs calories expended and the source of the calories shouldn't matter. This study is trying to prove that the source does matter--the rats received the same total calories including number of calories from carbs, the difference was whether the carbs were complex or simple-- and will hopefully go on to determine more about how the source matters. 

For people who strive to be healthy and avoid junk food anyway, this finding probably doesn't affect their food choices. But for some people it could make a difference, it could give them a push in the direction of  eliminating more simple carbs. Maybe its of more interest to me because I've noticed that sometimes I feel more "blah" after eating refined carbs. I had assumed that it was related to blood sugar but now I wonder if its also due to brain chemisty.

This article was more informative than the one about running and longevity. That one I felt was so inconclusive that it shouldn't have been publicized in mainstream media. But when I talked to dh (who is a scientist) he said that when scientists can make an association that its a "win"---they don't need to determine causes or all effects for the finding to be relevant. Then there's the part about publishing papers in general and how that is related to career---we talk about this a lot because ds is a grad student who has already published 3 times so they will let him have his degree a year early---so let's just say that the money was granted and spent sometime in the past, some organization thought the hypothesis was of value,  and we're just seeing the results of those few papers that the general public might find interesting. I try to look at all of these bits of info and data as puzzle pieces. As consumers we usually would prefer to be presented with the completed puzzle, for the scientists the challenge is in making the puzzle pieces and putting the thing together.

Community Leader
Registered: 04-05-2002
Wed, 04-09-2014 - 6:12pm

I still think, though, that the rat weights should be similar. Do we know that it's the refined diet or the obesity causing the problems? Don't think that I'm projunk food because I do believe diet makes a big difference. It just makes me want to make sure these studies are more accurate.  I think there might be something w/ our fat cells, too, that cause us to get lazy. I know I feel that way when I gain weight.






Community Leader
Registered: 09-25-2003
Thu, 04-10-2014 - 7:33am

Perhaps this is yet another impairment of diabetes?  A healthy patient maintains a gluccose level of 180 before the kidneys spill sugar into the urine.  A diabetic patient's glucose threshhold goes up to 220, that may be impairing the dopamine response?  I wonder what other impairments are going on that we have not yet discovered.  I think the article would be more interesting if there were more hypotheses that could result from these findings.  The other question that comes to mind is, "does this finding mean that Glycemic Index is validated because of the significant increase in gllucose load," or is it something else?  I saw one study that showed that the second sugar hits our tongues, "happy receptors" in the brain go off, without ingestion.  :O  The more sugar we ingest, the more it takes for the response, making the sugar response like an addictive drug.

A retrospective study, done years ago, (UKPDS) showed that for every 1% decrease in A1C (3 month history of glucose level), there was a corresponding 37% reduction in microvascular complications (e.g., nerve, kidney, and eye damage).  Although current studies have yet to prove a morbidity reduction, the micovascular reduction implies a better quality of life with reduced glucose.  This study shows additional brain chemistry impairment, again, reducing the quality of life?

Community Leader
Registered: 04-05-2002
Thu, 04-10-2014 - 5:49pm

Do rats get diabetes?






Community Leader
Registered: 09-25-2003
Mon, 04-14-2014 - 9:48am

I haven't been able to read this thread for a while...it kept taking me to a different page.  Anyways, I don't know if rats get diabetes.  :P  Despite animal protection groups, they are an inexpensive, low risk method for testing things that have human implications.  It's sort of sad.  I even felt bad putting down the ant traps at my mom's house, but they are driving her crazy.  :(

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-15-2014
Tue, 05-06-2014 - 11:45am
I have tried many times to completely rid my diet of junk foods. These foods mostly have no nutritional value. They does not benefit your body, you will be depriving your body of the vital nutrients it needs to remain healthy. Still because of taste we like them.