Hiring a Personal Trainer

Community Leader
Registered: 04-07-2008
Hiring a Personal Trainer
10
Thu, 03-01-2012 - 8:46am

I know that when most people think of hiring a personal trainer-they think rich people but I personally find they aren't really expensive (mine cost less than a pizza for one session) and well worth the money. I like to have one tweak my workouts every so often and I'm trying out a new trainer at the gym next week (She's young and new and saw my sister and I at the gym last night and invited us to try out a free session with her).

Karla
Community Leader
WALKING
EXERCISE and HEALTHY LIVING

Avatar for cmkarla
Administrator
Registered: 01-03-2001
Sat, 04-14-2012 - 9:41pm

Karla
Community ModeratoriVillage.com

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-02-2003
Tue, 03-20-2012 - 2:36pm
Hi Karla,

While I work as a trainer, I do so at the YMCA, so we do not operate like a personal trainer, more like a lifestyle coach.

I think that most of personal trainers cost anywhere from $60-$100 per hour depending on the gym.

Even at our gym our sessions are usually between 45 minutes to an hour, it really depends on the client. Sometimes if I'm putting together a split day routine I might book them in for 2 sessions to cover all the exercises (meaning we'll probably go for just over an hour). Our training is free to our members.

Look to see if they are certified, look to see them working with other clients in the gym and how they interact. Ask them if they have a particular area of expertise - you may not want a boxing coach if you are interested in yoga. LOL And feel free to switch trainers if you aren't happy. A personal trainer/client relationship is one that is built on trust and mutual understanding. You won't find that with every trainer, and can be trial and error until you find the coach that you think you can work with.

One thing about clients that is most enjoyable? I love it when a client is enthusiastic about trying new things, and follows through with their training plan. What I find irritating about clients? A client that comes in and says they want to lose 20 pounds and then lists off 20 excuses of why they can't possibly do this exercise or that exercise.

About being trained? One thing I love about trainers is that they have a lot of knowledge about different types of exercise that I might not have thought about, and they encourage you to work at an intensity that you might not have on your own. One thing I find irritating? Not taking into account what I enjoy doing - so if I tell them I'm not crazy about running don't give me a program that includes a lot of running.

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-12-2011
Tue, 03-20-2012 - 2:20pm

basically here are a few pointers

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-15-2004
Mon, 03-05-2012 - 6:27pm

I am a trainer and have used trainers so I can answer from both sides.

Community Leader
Registered: 04-05-2002
Fri, 03-02-2012 - 3:25pm

That's one reason I hate gym training. There's too much sales going on and they expect gung ho trainers who will do that.






Community Leader
Registered: 09-25-2003
Fri, 03-02-2012 - 1:18pm

I have never worked with a trainer, unless you consider swim coaches and dance instructors trainers.

Community Leader
Registered: 09-25-2003
Fri, 03-02-2012 - 1:13pm

Wow, SJ, what you write is inspirational.

Community Leader
Registered: 04-05-2002
Fri, 03-02-2012 - 7:36am

Being a trainer, I'm curious to read what others say. I've only used trainers here and there, in the past, for a session.






Community Leader
Registered: 04-05-2002
Fri, 03-02-2012 - 7:30am

Nice!






iVillage Member
Registered: 05-08-2006
Thu, 03-01-2012 - 9:15pm
I always feel like I need to say that I am single, childless, have a stressful and demanding, but well paying job. And I know I am lucky...that being said, I lift with a personal trainer three nights a week, and have for almost 9 years. Each session is an hour. I try to get to the gym 5 -10 minutes early to warm up on the stationary bike and we always finish with abs. I go near the end of the day, and sometimes my trainer runs late so I end up warming up longer. This is not an issue for me - he never cuts the session short and I understand it is a function of his personality to let people make him run late. I am usually the last or next to last client in the day, and the person after me is also a regular client who anticipates the lateness. I buy my sessions on a package, and they Cost@$60 a session. I occasionally ( like five times in 9 years ) have to cancel at the last minute due to work issues, and this has never been a problem. He is very accommodating about rescheduling if I need to, and also occasionally asks me to change either to accommodate something in his personal life or a client with a scheduling issue. I feel like this works out very fairly. I did not start out looking for a personal trainer. I was matched with him by the marketing director for my two orientation sessions. He is hardcore weight lifting, and I never thought that I would be interested in that. I joined the gym to swim in a desperate attempt to get control of my weight. I joined for the summer, and was on a 12 week trial period in my own mind. The reason I stayed with him was totally due to him. I come from the kind of family where praise was rare and criticism common, and I think I have always been most comfortable working for people who dealt with me like that. That is not my trainer's way at all. The hour long sessions were filled with 'good job' like comments. He was solicitous about my comfort, getting me water, asking about how I felt. I had never been treated like that. The lifting itself was challenging and I could tell I was burning calories, and I decided that I would spend the money for once a week sessions as part of my 12 week commitment to myself. I mean, what could be better than having this absolutely gorgeous, sweet guy encouraging and praising me for doing squats and lunges? The experience changed my life. The lifting itself changed my body. It also changed my perception of myself and what I could physically do. It made me realize how much I was the kind of person who could set and commit to a goal. I realized that praise felt great, and I started to praise the people who work for me. My trainer talks to me about nutrition, not in a lecturing way, but in a way that helped me change one habit at a time. He encouraged m to learn how to cook for myself. He motivates me to work out on non lifting days by asking what I did or acknowledging that he noticed that I was at the gym. He suggests things other than lifting that I might like to try. We have some common interests - mostly sports, and our discussions are always enjoyable. He continues to challenge me. When I broke my foot (walking to the gym), he went to the ER with me. Then he called me to see what time I was coming in to the gym the next day - when I pointed out that my foot was broken, he said 'nothing wrong with your arms'. He kept me from sliding off the workout path. He is knowledgable, kind, and yet sets the bar very high. I don't know if I could ever replace him because to me, I have had the best trainer for me. There are other trainers at my gym who I know through classes and just being there, but I don't think any of them get results like my trainer does. I wish that everyone could have the opportunity I have to train with someone who is great at it. SJ