Lance Armstrong and the confession

Community Leader
Registered: 04-07-2008
Lance Armstrong and the confession
12
Fri, 01-18-2013 - 10:46am

Is anyone following the Lance doping saga? What do you think about Lance Armstrong's confession and his "deeply flawed" statement? 

I personally think it is shameful that he lied, cheated, tormented people, and got away with it for so long and then suddenly blabs his heart out.What is it that he is really expecting-kwim?  

Karla
Community Leader
WALKING
EXERCISE and HEALTHY LIVING

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iVillage Member
Registered: 06-15-2012
Fri, 01-18-2013 - 10:57am

I'm glad the truth finally came out; but I was appalled at how blasé he came across in Oprah’s interview. I mean really... he didn’t just deny for years, he verbally and legally attacked people and tried to ruin lives! And he supposedly counted a lot of those people as friends... and a simple apology is supposed to charm them (and us) now? I don’t think so. 

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-15-2004
Fri, 01-18-2013 - 11:08am

I think it's awful.  I heard something on TV that perhaps he waited the amount of time he did in order to wait out a statute of limitations (I don't know if that's true but if it is, this is even more disgusting).  

It's a shame because the Livestrong foundation does really wonderful things for cancer and it's also become a decent go-to site for health and fitness questions.  

He doesn't get any points for coming clean now.  His credibility was shot when the doping claims came up and he denied them vehemently.  That would have been a more honorable time to come out with this.  

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-09-2010
Fri, 01-18-2013 - 11:21am

He is looking for the easy way out and he doesn't deserve it in my opinion. He should have to give back all his awards including every last penny. His name forever should used as a great example of self-absorbtion, greed, selfishness, poor sportsmanship, bullying, envy, strife, and grief.

Nancy
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-15-2004
Fri, 01-18-2013 - 11:48am
That's a good point about the money. I wonder if his endorsers will sue him.
Community Leader
Registered: 04-05-2002
Fri, 01-18-2013 - 3:06pm

I agree w/ what everyone else said. I said this elsewhere but I think it's one thing to choose to destroy your body; it's another to destroy other people's reputation and coerce them to destroy their bodies. He's no better than a drug dealer.  What surprises me is the amount of support he still has. I don't think steroid/PED are the issue--it's how he chose to deal w/ the aftermath that is the problem.  The apology? Ulterior motive written all over it.






iVillage Member
Registered: 05-08-2006
Fri, 01-18-2013 - 5:26pm
My mother never made us say 'sorry' for doing things we shouldn't. To her 'sorry' was easy to say...if we were sorry, we had to show it by doing something to make amends...and if we weren't sorry, even when we should be, then she didn't want us saying we were. I still really feel like that...if you are sorry you are late, next time, don't be late...if you fail to keep a commitment, next time don't make a committment you can't meet. If you break rules and profit by it, and you would do it again...then you aren't sorry. I think you can feel badly for things you do in anger or ignorance, but not for deliberate decisions when you know right from wrong...I would rather he said 'winning was everything and I did everything to win'. Then we could examine the culture of competition we celebrate and how we feel about winners and losers. But I don't think he is sorry for anything except getting caught - although I didn't see the interview...but I am not sorry for having an opinion anyway...
Community Leader
Registered: 09-25-2003
Mon, 01-21-2013 - 8:31am
I would really like to know why, now, after ere all this time, is he telling the "truth"? I find that the motivation behind an action is just as important as the action itself. I think it's horibble for all of the athletes that didn't do the drugs. They worked so hard, following the ethical rules, and never got a chance to get the glory. But, perhaps, now, those individuals can feel SOME vindication internally, deep in their spirit. However, it sounds like doing the drugs were almost mainstream, and that they were "lemmings", just trying to win. I didn't watch the entire interview (I fell asleep), but I was appalled that he was so adamant about winning ONE race, without being on the drugs. Really?! He lied for how many years, how many countless times, and you want us to believe ANYTHING you have to say? He admitted to being a bully, which is abusive behavior, and I am uncertain in believing that a bully can change his ways. I think THAT is when I fell asleep... I DO think it's a shame that his foundation isn't doing well, but that organization should just find a different role model and move on. His "winning spirit" was based on false premise, and, perhaps, that is why things didn't work out with Sheryl Crow? I remember her interview, after her split with Lance, where she just stated something like, "sometimes, you thnk you really know someone, and then, later, you find out you really didn't know that person at all..."
Community Leader
Registered: 04-07-2008
Mon, 01-21-2013 - 11:52am

Good point about Sheryl Crow. I'd love to know what she thinks about all this nonsense. 

Karla
Community Leader
WALKING
EXERCISE and HEALTHY LIVING

Community Leader
Registered: 09-25-2003
Wed, 01-23-2013 - 8:41am

Speaking of which, Sheryl Crow sounds like a class act based on the media interviews she has done.

http://xfinity.comcast.net/articles/entertainment-eonline/20130122/b380583/?cid=hero_media

"Lance Armstrong 's life of lies couldn't have been easy.

Sheryl Crow, who dated the disgraced cyclist from 2003 to 2006, seems to have empathy for her ex-fiancé. She told Entertainment Tonight that it's "got to be really hard to walk around knowing that you're not telling the truth about something."

5 biggest bombshells from Lance and Oprah's interview

"I think that honesty is always the best bet and that the truth will set you free," she added. "To carry a weight like that around would be devastating in the long run…I always contend that the truth is the best way to go."

Last week, Lance finally admitted to Oprah Winfrey he used performance-enhancing drugs for all seven of his Tour de France wins. He blamed his "ruthless desire to win at all costs" for leading him to cheat and attempt to cover up his lies for so many years.

And while Sheryl was gracious about her ex's downfall, we bet she's secretly glad to have been set free of that relationship.

Lance had lots of famous friends"

Community Leader
Registered: 04-05-2002
Wed, 01-23-2013 - 3:03pm

I've read articles that say he's a sociopath and it seems to fit. He doesn't seem at all remorseful for what he did to others.  If there were true remorse, he would have contacted them first.  Oprah is a poor choice.






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