Self-Control vs Self-Esteem in learning

Community Leader
Registered: 12-21-2001
Self-Control vs Self-Esteem in learning
4
Mon, 01-28-2013 - 5:11pm
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iVillage Member
Registered: 07-12-2013
Mon, 01-27-2014 - 9:53am

  Developing self-control or self-confidence begins at birth and continues across our lives which enables children to cooperate with others, to cope with frustration, and to resolve conflicts. 

 http://www.artsandlearning.org/

Community Leader
Registered: 12-21-2001
Fri, 02-01-2013 - 6:36pm
I enjoyed your (pl) insights. As a retired teacher I've always worried if in homeschooling the parent-teacher was more prone to overpraising than a professional teacher with a variety of students?
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Community Leader
Registered: 01-04-2004
Wed, 01-30-2013 - 8:12am

that is really interesting, especially the part about students shying away from hard tasks due to fear of failure. i never thought about that before. if they're going to receive praise for the littlest things, then why would they bother trying harder? so i guess boosting their self-esteem only (without challenging them) is like inflation - you're raising the ticket price but not the value. thanks for sharing this article!

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-09-2010
Tue, 01-29-2013 - 11:41am

This is absolutely fascinating. As a piano teacher, I find that my students who have been continually praised and glorified by their parents over every little thing don't try as hard as those who have had to earn praise with something extra ordinary. Those who are used to being praised have lower self-confidence and don't work well unless I continually praise and reassure them. They don't seem to be able to function independently without constant feedback.

I read once many years ago that you should never save every scrap of paper your child draws on but only certain select art projects that they have taken time and put much effor into. That way it emphasizes effort and concern for detail.

It is all very interesting.

Nancy