Need some advice on jobs

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-09-2002
Need some advice on jobs
14
Tue, 07-19-2011 - 1:21pm

As some of you know, I am a substitute teacher.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 02-11-2006
Tue, 07-19-2011 - 3:17pm
Hi Erin,

I don't think I have any good advice for you, but I can certainly understand your feelings of being burnt out and frustrated. Working two jobs is difficult, and you've been doing it for a long time. I was a teacher before I had kids. I left teaching 10 years ago and it is difficult to get back in after such a long absence. I live in a suburban area that has three school districts all within a few miles of my house. One is incredibly difficult to get into--you really have to know someone. The other two are competitive and always seem to have job postings, but they want bilingual and/or recent experience. The district I taught in years ago had a reputation for hiring it's qualified teaching aides when positions opened up for a teacher. Other districts I know have a reputation for hiring their long-term subs. Do know what the politics are like for your district? Could you get a full-time teacher aide job that might be more likely to morph into an actual teaching position?

My brother majored in English and Journalism. He taught high school in Chicago's inner city for a few years, but was quickly burned out and left to work at a textbook publishing company. He also teaches some college courses in the evenings. He likes his work now, and he does not plan to return to teaching at the high school level.

As a stay at home mom, I can certainly understand your feelings of not pulling your fair share and of not doing what you set out to do. But please don't consider yourself a failure. You are NOT a failure. It is OK to change your life course at any point. What do YOU want to do? Do you still feel like teaching is your passion?

Hugs,
Community Leader
Registered: 07-26-1999
Tue, 07-19-2011 - 4:38pm
Just some quick thoughts off the top of my head for you Erin, and I don't know if any are viable, but just trying to think sort of out of the box. Have you looked at private or charter schools around the area? What are daycare providers that offer a pre-K program for 3-4 year olds. I know particularly in Texas, there was talk about getting rid of pre-K funding for schools, and right now, unless you are economically disadvantaged or military, you have to pay for pre-k through the local schools and only if they have slots open, so if you want any sort of pre-k, you do private or go through the daycares. What about management at a daycare facility chain? Also, I don't know if your state has region service centers for the school, or the state education agency. I work in the legal department at the education agency and a lot of staff in the agency are former teachers or educators, and the region service centers that the state has employ teachers and educators to assist current teachers and school districts with training. Also, what about doing tutoring or working for a tutoring company?

Those are just my thoughts thinking along the educational lines.
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Community Leader
Registered: 08-25-2006
Tue, 07-19-2011 - 7:03pm

Well, my suggestions are more worldly than practical.

Serenity
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-21-2011
Wed, 07-20-2011 - 12:51am

Hi Erin,

I understand your frustration because I lived that way for many years...I was also a teacher and never earned enough money. But I loved teaching and all the benefits such as long summer vacations, professional development, etc.

When I moved to Canada, I discovered that it was nearly impossible for me to become a teacher here. Things close to teaching were opening my own family daycare (which I did, but was a giant business failure), or as you are considering, teaching online. I checked into tutoring at home and at private institutions and teaching in different levels. Writing children's books was another think I checked, but as English is not my first language, it wasn't very realistic, unless I did it in my own language.

I finally became a career counsellor. I had to study again, but I also used the experience and foundations I had as a teacher, and it is working really good. As a counsellor, I have to create materials and facilitate workshops, so it is very rewarding. Not sure if that would work for you.

You seem very young, so my suggestion is try to get an appointment with a career counsellor in your area. In Canada, this is a free service. What we do is review your life, your dreams/goals and then your current situation: taking into account factors such as the household financial situation, family support and other existent networks around you, options in your area, in terms of job market, study programs and also community resources you can use. We use some specific tools to evaluate your values, attitudes, skills, etc and this can help you to decide what path to take. However, the path has to be matched with the reality of your life...so the best person is somebody who lives where you live and can have a few sessions, helping to take the right decision.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2005
Wed, 07-20-2011 - 7:08am

In the six years of subbing, have you taken any professional development courses?

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-09-2002
Wed, 07-20-2011 - 10:23am

I have taken a couple of graduate level courses and some courses offered through the school districts as well.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 05-09-2002
Wed, 07-20-2011 - 10:30am

Thanks for the help!

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iVillage Member
Registered: 11-14-2008
Wed, 07-20-2011 - 11:12am

Hi Erin,

I'm afraid with the school systems there and you living in

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-31-2010
Wed, 07-20-2011 - 12:11pm
Looking at demographics, and municiple revenue due to the housing bust, the figures show that teaching just will not be coming back for at least 5 -10 years so it might be in your best interest to really look into another career.

DH works in IT with teachers - they didn't get a degree in IT, but they are doing it now. You could easily do freelance writing, or take that editorial job as well.

The issue is that the soft (not math/science/tech) jobs are just not as plentiful at this point.

If you can hold out, do so, but what about managing evenings in a restaurant or something that pays better than what you get at the resort, but is more evening based so you can still stay in the sub game?

-Marie
#Marie
iVillage Member
Registered: 09-26-2007
Wed, 07-20-2011 - 1:10pm

I don't know what tutoring places are around you but I know a lot of substitute teachers around here work for Sylvan or Kumon, and they pay pretty decently I think. A lot of parents also use these services in the summer to get their kids caught up so it may be a more steady income stream. Good luck!

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