Thanksgiving in Mississippi

Community Leader
Registered: 02-27-1999
Thanksgiving in Mississippi
5
Mon, 11-26-2012 - 7:48pm

I had beautiful weather for November, and for Thanksgiving.  This is probably the last of it though.  I still have roses in bloom, and my rosemary bush is now in my kitchen.  

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iVillage Member
Registered: 05-29-2012
Fri, 11-30-2012 - 1:06am

Your rose bush is beautiful! Does it require any special care?

Community Leader
Registered: 02-27-1999
Sun, 12-02-2012 - 12:57pm

Nope!  It's an antique variety, not a hybrid.  A friend dug it up in the wild, and planted it by my shed.  In 2 years it was so big that I could not open the shed door.  I cut it back to the ground, and in 2 more years, it was a problem again.  So when I cut it down again, I dug up the root ball and moved it.  I really did not expect it to live.  But it's thriving in the new location!  And it can get as BIG as it wants there!  

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iVillage Member
Registered: 05-29-2012
Fri, 12-07-2012 - 12:37pm

Wow, it's really beautiful. I have a rose bush that used to look like that. My father planted it probably over 50 years ago. I guess that qualifies it (and me lol) as an antique. It was also moved, quite a while ago, but doesn't seem to be thriving anymore. I keep having to remove dead wood, which is very hard because it's very prickly. Any ideas how I could get it to thrive again? I would hate to lose it as it's one of the few plants left from my father.

Community Leader
Registered: 02-27-1999
Fri, 12-07-2012 - 7:12pm

The pattern of light and shade in your new location may have changed since you replanted it.  It could be as simple as limbing up a nearby tree.  You might also look at the PH of your soil.  My mom swore that roses did not do well near pines.  A master gardener or the local extension office can help you with a soil PH test.  

I've never used rose food but that is worth a shot.  Dead wood is pretty much to be expected, and it helps to get air circulating to prevent powdery mildew.  If your roses get black spots, spray them with a thin solution of water and dry skim milk powder.  Mulch (which I have never used) will keep splash from causing problems with roses, and if it gets cold in winter, you will want mulch for insulation.  My winters are mild so I don't mulch.  

Does any of that sound like it might help?  

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Registered: 05-29-2012
Mon, 12-17-2012 - 2:14am

Thanks, I'll try some rose food in the spring and see about testing the soil. There are pine trees in the vicinity, but they've been there longer than the rose bush. The only thing that's changed is I've added some lilies and peonies near it.