If you are someone who purchases and uses craft books,

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-03-2001
If you are someone who purchases and uses craft books,
6
Sat, 09-22-2012 - 2:07pm

do you assume that the patterns were tested before publication? Have you found errors? Do you think pattern testing should be part of the publication process?  Abby Glassenberg would like feedback --- see her article: http://whileshenaps.typepad.com/whileshenaps/2012/09/most-patterns-in-sewing-books-are-published-untested-and-why-that-should-change.html

I can't say that I have found that many erors in embroidery books but I have in magazine articles. There was this one three-dimensional ornament I wanted to stitch adn the measurements were ALL wrong. I finally gave up and winged it but it was very frustrating! And wasteful as well,  since a lot of fabric and thread, already stitched, had to be discarded since the peices didn't fit together!

I know that some publisher sites publish errata but isn't that a little late. you've bought the book (or magazine) started the project, run into a snag and then what? So you think to check the publisher site for errata? I don't...



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Community Leader
Registered: 07-31-1998

I haven't found any errors in books but I sure have in magazines. This makes me wonder if the magazine errors are caught before the designs are included in books. Having stitched for a designer, I know that designs are stitched to find errors as well as to make up models for picture taking.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-03-2001

Given the reasoning given in that articla for publishers not testing patterns (price, pure and simple), I know that embroidery, especially cross stitch and needlepoint, often use model stitchers, and many stores/shops do as well --- some shops recoup the cost by selling the models after a certain period of time but deisgners don't have that option... I suspect that the burden on a designer of paying for model stitchers just drives up the price of patterns at the shop, KWIM? 



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Community Leader
Registered: 07-31-1998

I was never paid. That is why I didn't like it when she told me I didn't stitch quickly enough! I was friends with a designer and I didn't feel like I needed one more thing hanging on my wall or one more pillow so I was just stitching for her out of friendship and the love of stitching. When you stitch like this you have to make corrections on the pattern as you go along.

I stitched a braided ribbon pillow using some of my own designs and some of hers. With permission, I was to release the pattern under my own name. She was teaching me to be a designer! Then she released her designs so I couldn't release it without starting over again. We haven't been friends in years!!!!

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-03-2001

See, to me that is a major problem --- you stitch for the designer for free but she "profits" in some way from your work. Not only does her pattern get checked, she gets a model for trunk shows, photography on charts/magazines/patterns/books, etc.

What do you get in return? The enjoyment form stitching the piece --- but that is probably tempered by having to be "perfect" (Something I am clearly not good at!), to stitch on a schedue (something else I've never been good at!)  to keep notes (some instructions from some designers need a total rewrite, IMO --- so instruction manual writeing experience could come in handle too!), etc. --- which means you have to be a spectacular stitcher (which I know you are). But, in the end,  there is no recognition, no acknowledgement of your skill.

And if, indeed, all designers treated their model stitchers like this one treated you, they'd never get another volunteer!



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Community Leader
Registered: 07-31-1998

I got a personally signed copy of the book when it came out!!!!!!

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-03-2001
maryfrances40 wrote:

I got a personally signed copy of the book when it came out!!!!!!

WOW!



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