1 in 4 children in US raised by a single parent

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Registered: 04-07-2002
1 in 4 children in US raised by a single parent
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Wed, 04-27-2011 - 2:12pm
1 in 4 children in US raised by a single parent One in four children in the United States is being raised by a single parent - a percentage that has been on the rise and is higher than other developed countries, according to a report released Wednesday. http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/nationworld/2014884815_apussingleparenthomes.html By CHRISTINE ARMARIO Associated Press MIAMI — One in four children in the United States is being raised by a single parent - a percentage that has been on the rise and is higher than other developed countries, according to a report released Wednesday. Of the 27 industrialized countries studied by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, the U.S. had 25.8 percent of children being raised by a single parent, compared with an average of 14.9 percent across the other countries. Ireland was second (24.3 percent), followed by New Zealand (23.7 percent). Greece, Spain, Italy and Luxemborg had among the lowest percentages of children in single-parent homes. Experts point to a variety of factors to explain the high U.S. figure, including a cultural shift toward greater acceptance of single-parent child rearing. The U.S. also lacks policies to help support families, including childcare at work and national paid maternity leave, which are commonplace in other countries. "When our parents married, there was a sense that you were marrying for life," said Edward Zigler, founder and director of Yale's Edward Zigler Center in Child Development and Social Policy. "That sense is not as prevalent." Single parents in the U.S. were more likely to be employed - 35.8 percent compared to a 21.3 percent average - but they also had higher rates of poverty, the report found. "The in-work poverty is higher in the U.S. than other OECD countries, because at the bottom end of the labor market, earnings are very low," said Willem Adema, a senior economist in the group's social policy division. "For parents, the risk is higher because they have to make expenditures on childcare costs." The Paris-based organization looked at a broad sector of indicators that affected families and children, including childhood poverty, early education and amount of time spent on parental care. Across the nations examined, preschool enrollment has grown from 30 to 50 percent between 1998 and 2007. The average enrollment was 58.2 percent, while in the U.S. it was lower. The report noted that public spending on child welfare and education is higher in the U.S. than in other countries - $160,000 per child compared to $149,000. However, the authors say most of that money is spent after the crucial early childhood years. "This means early investment - including childcare and support for families around the time of birth - could be strengthened," the authors wrote in a separate paper examining the United States. The study pointed out that the U.S. is the only OECD country that does not have a national paid parental leave policy. Some states have started to adopt such policies, but most parents are offered 12 weeks of unpaid leave. This is particularly difficult for unwed mothers, who may not be able to afford to take time off, Zigler said. "We have not built in the kind of national support systems for families and children that other countries have," he said. Childhood poverty rates in the U.S. are also expected to climb - 23.5 percent from 20 percent. Adema said the rise is a direct result of the financial crisis and higher unemployment rates. "The financial strain causes all sorts of other strain, so ultimately it might contribute to family dissolution," Adema said. "At the same time, it might bring some families together. I suspect that the response differs across families." The single parent phenomenon has been occurring over recent decades. The study noted the U.S. and England have higher teenage birthrates than other countries, partially contributing to the higher single-parent numbers, though the proportion of children born outside marriage was not significantly higher than the other countries. Christina Gibson Davis, a professor at Duke University's Sanford School of Public Policy, said changing gender roles, the rise of contraception, high incarceration rates in some communities and an acceptance of having children out of wedlock have all contributed to the growing number. Terry O'Neill, president of the National Organization for Women, added it isn't being a single parent in itself that raises difficulties. "Single moms do a brilliant and amazing job raising their children," said Terry O'Neill, president of the National Organization for Women. "It is also true that single moms in this country are systemically underpaid, and systematically under-resourced and systemically unrespected. It's not the fact they are single moms that makes things difficult."

 nwtreehugger  

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iVillage Member
Registered: 04-07-2002
Thu, 09-01-2011 - 11:38am
Sometimes it's an 'unavoidable' choice, but it's for the best. I agree.

 nwtreehugger  

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-12-2011
Wed, 08-31-2011 - 12:45pm

The permeation of liberalism has led to the degradation of society.

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-2011

That is a very true post. There are many single moms out there, but that is something you can't avoid. Single Parentism isn't bad, in fact, it is a choice that has been made.

Stacy is a single mom and mother of 3. Visit her site, single mom financial help, for great info and tips for single moms to enhance their life style.
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-07-2002
My dad left when I was 2. My father figure was my grandfather, who lived 1700 miles away. Yes, it's harder...but it would have been much worse with my dad in the home. Take my word for it. Yes, I did without some of the things my friends took for granted, but my mom (thankfully) had a college education & was able to get a job that allowed her to pay the mortgage every month. I've had friends with both parents at home who had it MUCH harder than I did - at least emotionally. I may not have had 'stuff' but I was in a loving & happy environment.

A friend of mine has raised both of her DD's on her own. Was it ideal, nope. But she did an absolutely fantastic job!

So, I would say to anyone (male or female) who wants to raise a child on their own, that they think about it carefully & talk to those who have...I certainly wouldn't say that they couldn't do a fine job on their own.

 nwtreehugger  

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-23-2008

I had to go to work, and come home to take care of my children.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-23-2008

I can tell you from experience that raising a child without one parent is terrible.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-18-2000
Excellent post.
Welcome to the board.

 


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iVillage Member
Registered: 05-01-2011
Systematically "Underpaid" is a delibrate, horrendous thing which happens to 70% of this nations workers. Being underpaid, is a dirty little secret seldomly spoken of. The Government and Corporations do not want us to speak of the unthinkable truth.

Those who know about this are the poor themselves. Whom can they afford to tell but other poor. Magazines and newspapers rarely carry the words of the poor themselves. But they know first hand "How the system is broken". And what needs to be fixed

They are the ones who lose Homes do to injury, and long waits for public and private insurance's. Being told they do not qualify for aid, due to retirement funds, should be cashed in, for pennies upon what it is worth in ten years.

I am delighted that Terry O'Neil of NOW, used that descriptive phrase, "Underpaid". Until we focus on fixing the real flaws we cannot move ahead as humanity. We will not be able to control the weather until we End Poverty. And that will take paying everyone Enough to pay their rent, food, clothes, health care, co pays and over the counter drug and beauty or personal needs, insurance,transportation, repairs, modest recreation,cooling and heating and utilities.

Having enough income to pay these basics of life, means your are making a livable wage. Having $1 less then required to cover all thebills each month means you are in poverty. Most workers have hundreds, if not close to 1,000 of dollars, less than they need each month.

It is time reality of 70% of the US population is examined and exposed. This is what the US Dept. of Labor says when it says only 30% of workers are paid a livable wage. The other side of that satistic leaves 70% of our nation mired in poverty.

Why shouldn't a new economy of enough exist? Where people working as hard as they can, for as long as permitted are paid the need. Less than 1% of this worlds income would wipe out poverty.

We need the single moms in some states writing for newspapers and magazines how they are paid less than the need, both working and on Welfare, are often paid less then the amount of rent and toilet paper, before as a species we reach a level of society where wiseness is the standard.

To End Poverty we must hold employers accountable for adequate pay. It's foolish to think people working as hard as their bodies and employer will allow, will magically find the extra hundreds to a thousand more yhen their pay. Will must deem it right to pay the full need part-time or full time.
iVillage Member
Registered: 08-30-2002
Mon, 05-02-2011 - 11:38am

Wic actually started out as a subsidy



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Registered: 02-15-2007

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