Alabama's Immigration Law

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-13-2009
Alabama's Immigration Law
30
Thu, 09-29-2011 - 6:45pm

 

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iVillage Member
Registered: 02-05-2011
Sat, 10-01-2011 - 3:52pm
Read the summary at the bottom of her report. The first 100 pages is mostly background on the Alabama law, how to apply the supremacy clause, immigration law, various decisions regarding portions of federal immigration law and how the Alabama law either works with or violates these.

Alabama wants to know if children are not here legally, but will educate them, they are going to attempt determination of the cost these kids impose on the state. The kids and family have privacy rights and can sue if their privacy is invaded.

Alabama won't issue permits or licenses to those not legally here. This largely seems to be a states rights issue per the federal judge.
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-05-2011
Sat, 10-01-2011 - 3:54pm
Would you prefer to school to discriminate against the kids who were having trouble with English? Or who were otherwise not as smart as your daughter? That would be judgmental! Isn't it better not to segregate our kids, or make one group feel worse?
iVillage Member
Registered: 05-03-2011
Sat, 10-01-2011 - 4:14pm
Expecting 100% of students to be at grade level (proficient) is asinine and impossible. It does not take into account students who are learning English, or special education students, or even just students who are a bit slower than average. It's a completely impossible goal.

It just seems so weird to me that one would sneer at something that is true just to score a political point against the president. It also seems weird that you think that assessing the growth of all students on an individual basis, ensuring that they are all learning and growing constitutes "discarding additional generations...blah, blah, blah." In point of fact, making sure that all students are improving each and every year IS making sure that no student is left behind or ignored.
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-07-2002
Sat, 10-01-2011 - 4:17pm
The more I read, the more I realize how lucky my DD was! She attended public school but she went to a progressive education school from K thru 8th and then was in the International Baccalaureate program in high school. Her K-8 had special needs kids but the teachers had training ... plus they did "team" teaching so they could divide the students into groups. That way no one was held back or left behind.

 nwtreehugger  

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-03-2011
Sat, 10-01-2011 - 4:24pm
Thanks. I found the pertinent section regarding education. The decision to note immigration status of students may likely stand. The schools (at least in my experience) already require birth certificates of students in order to enroll in school...they just don't make note if the birth certificate is from the U.S. or another country. If they are not compiling the data or using the information to have the parents deported, they just may get away with collecting that information.
iVillage Member
Registered: 08-30-2002
Sat, 10-01-2011 - 5:15pm

Are you being facetious?

I don't see why anyone has to be discriminated against, just placed properly. As I recall from my old school days, "special needs" kids went to "special needs" classes or had "special aids." Meanwhile, kids, like my daughter, were tested out and given more challenging work, not left to stare at the walls and wait. When I



iVillage Member
Registered: 05-03-2011
Sat, 10-01-2011 - 5:21pm
Where did you go to school? Sounds like they met your needs better than my schools. In elementary school (30+ years ago), I was left to my own devices. I always had my nose in a book when I was done with everything or I would make up my own projects to work on. I'd decide I wanted to learn about a specific thing and ask to go to the library where I would research whatever it was, write a report with pictures and maps, etc. It kept me busy, but I had to do that on my own. It wasn't something that was suggested by any of my teachers. I'm doing my level best to ensure that my daughter gets what she needs in school, even though she is far ahead of the rest of the class.
iVillage Member
Registered: 08-30-2002
Sat, 10-01-2011 - 5:23pm

Also, would like to add, when I was in school we were getting Laotian refugees. These kids were pulled out of class, maybe an hour a day (one period), for English language classes, otherwise they were in regular classes. On average, it took them about 6 weeks, to learn enough English to learn, communicate with their teachers and classmates, and be functional within the school. Two sisters, I remember well, both ended up becoming cheerleaders and one of them was class president. This was the second year they attended my school, that they managed these feats, and they had arrived the middle of the previous



iVillage Member
Registered: 08-30-2002
Sat, 10-01-2011 - 5:26pm

At first I was in Southern California, in Orange County. Then I was in Marietta, Ga. Then we came back to Cali. I ended up in one of the first Charter Schools in the state for HS, which allowed me to take classes at the local JC, because I had more than enough units to graduate early but I preferred to get a head start on college while in HS. I know I would ha ve been a major PIA if I had been allowed to be bored for long.



iVillage Member
Registered: 11-13-2009
Sat, 10-01-2011 - 6:52pm
<< I don't agree with dumbing down smart kids so the lowest performers don't feel bad about themselves.>>

I don't, either.

 

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