Blacks' Wealth 20 Times Less Than Whites in U.S.A.

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-23-2010
Blacks' Wealth 20 Times Less Than Whites in U.S.A.
85
Tue, 07-26-2011 - 10:25pm

I heard all over the news today that the average household wealth for blacks is about $5,300 and for whites it is around $113,500. This is the highest wealth difference between blacks and whites ever. Is it time to increase affirmative action programs for blacks?

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-03-2009
Please explain the many negative comments (if you like I could winnow through posts and copy quotations) about the resources which are provided to children with special needs. Just the statement that the system "[favors] special needs kids over the regular kids" leaves me gasping with disbelief. In the fifteen years when my two children progressed from kindergarten to 12th grade, I saw no such thing.

A gifted educator once explained resource allocation this way:
"If you were standing in a line and you fell down and were clearly in physical distress because of a heart attack, wouldn't it make sense to stop everything and give you CPR? What if other people complained that the extra attention "wasn't fair"? Would that make any sense? Well, that's basically the same situation children with handicaps face in the classroom. They're struggling to survive, in many cases." Begrudging the rescue efforts is just petty.

But since circumstances, training, and resources can vary tremendously through variables like school district, teacher, and child, I will simply say this. The law mandates least restrictive environment for a reason. And that reason has to do with how well children will be able to fare in the world AFTER they have left a structured learning environment. Institutionalization, as opposed to a productive and independent life, is in NOBODY'S best interests. Not the tax payer, not the individual, not society as a whole.

Last but not least, you might want to consider what it would be like to either be a child with disabilities or the parent of that child. Maybe it would engender a bit more sympathy and a bit less resentment.

Jabberwocka

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-03-2011
This is true. There were some teachers in the schools where I worked who the special education teacher had to fight and threaten every step of the way to make accommodations for students.
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-03-2009

In working with parents who had children with special needs, I found that some teachers were more receptive than others to making adaptations and modifications. There were some who wouldn't do diddly squat UNLESS there was some form of coercion or duress applied.

We heard regularly how it wasn't "fair" to accommodate kids who maybe needed extra time to take a test, somebody reading them the questions instead, and taking an oral answer, etc. In defense of the teachers, many had not been trained to work with the children who had massive challenges to face in their learning environment. Once they understood that not all disabilities were physically visible, some tried to be more cooperative. But even with awareness training and materials there were teachers I would not trust with a cockroach, much less a young child.

Your "chaos-free" classroom is very often a function of the skilled and experienced teacher; just as much as it's a function of the children in the classroom.

Jabberwocka

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-07-2011

(What's more, there's a note of resentment and jealousy on the topic of providing services for children with special needs that seems so petty, so mean, so totally (and perhaps willfully) ignorant of the challenges they face.)

Not at all.

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-07-2011

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-03-2009

I have volunteered as an advocate to help parents learn how to negotiate the maze of diagnostic tools, to participate in the process of writing an individualized education plan (IEP), to figure out their child's strengths and play to them as well as learning how to compensate for weaknesses.

There are certainly more sides than one to most stories. I am well aware that conventional education in a "normal" classroom can be brutal for children who are "different".

Jabberwocka

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-07-2011

(Don't bother to "go on and on" because the story and perceptions would still be yours and the other bits of the puzzle

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-18-2000
I've heard of similar scenarios.

 


Photobucket&nbs

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-03-2011
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Same here.

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Very true.
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-03-2009

I am aware that you told your story and your perceptions. Unless you were part of the diagnostic team and involved in the development of a child's IEP, you don't know as much as you may think about the children who have been mainstreamed. First grade is mighty early days to make sweeping generalizations about what ANY child is capable of.

Don't bother to "go on and on" because the story and perceptions would still be yours and the other bits of the puzzle

Jabberwocka

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