Federal government warns local schools to watch facebook

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-05-2011
Federal government warns local schools to watch facebook
4
Wed, 03-16-2011 - 1:01pm

Where does free speech end and cyber bullying start? Where does the authority of the federal governemnt end and that of the state begin? I am no fan of cyber bullying, and think our Supreme Court has been too open to bullying via expression as protected speech, but I'm not certain the federal government should be threatening local school districts to police internet either.

http://dailycaller.com/2011/03/16/fed-instructs-teachers-to-facebook-creep-students/

Fed instructs teachers to Facebook creep students


Education Department officials are threatening school principals with lawsuits if they fail to monitor and curb students’ lunchtime chat and evening Facebook time for expressing ideas and words that are deemed by Washington special-interest groups to be harassment of some students.

There has only been muted opposition to this far-reaching policy among the professionals and advocates in the education sector, most of whom are heavily reliant on funding and support from top-level education officials. The normally government-averse tech-sector is also playing along, and on Mar. 11, Facebook declared that it was “thrilled” to work with White House officials to foster government oversight of teens’ online activities.

The only formal opposition has come from the National School Board Association, which declined to be interviewed by The DC.

The agency’s threats, which are delivered in a so-called “Dear Colleague” letter,” have the support of White House officials, including President Barack Obama, who held a Mar. 10 White House meeting to promote the initiative as a federal “anti-bullying” policy.

The letter says federal officials have reinterpreted the civil-rights laws that require school principals to curb physical bullying, as well as racist and sexist speech, that take place within school boundaries. Under the new interpretation, principals and their schools are legally liable if they fail to curb “harassment” of students, even if it takes place outside the school, on Facebook or in private conversation among a few youths.

“Harassing conduct may take many forms, including verbal acts and name-calling; graphic and written statements, which may include use of cell phones or the Internet… it does not have to include intent to harm, be directed at a specific target, or involve repeated incidents [but] creates a hostile environment … [which can] limit a student’s ability to participate in or benefit from the services, activities, or opportunities offered by a school,” according to the far-reaching letter, which was completed Oct. 26 by Russlynn Ali, who heads the agency’s civil rights office.

School officials will face lawsuits even when they are ignorant about students’ statements, if a court later decides they “reasonably should have known” about their students’ conduct, said the statement.

Following the discovery of “harassment,” officials may have to require mandatory training of students and their families, according to the Ali letter. “The school may need to provide training or other interventions not only for the perpetrators, but also for the larger school community, to ensure that all students, their families, and school staff can recognize harassment if it recurs and know how to respond… [and] provide additional services to the student who was harassed in order to address the effects of the harassment,” said the letter.

Facebook is developing new features that will make it harder for principals to miss episodes of online “harassment,” and so will increase the likelihood of government action against the teenage users of Facebook and other social-media. “We’re adding a unique feature, developed with safety experts, that lets people also report content to someone in their support system (like a parent or teacher) who may be able to address the issue more directly,’ Facebook declared Mar. 11. “It is our hope that features like this will help not only remove the offensive content but also help people get to the root of the problem,” the company statement declared.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-18-2000
If taken seriously imagine what this incident could do to a teacher's reputation & career......

 


Photobucket&nbs

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-18-2000
I read an article where a teacher was told by the school board to not 'friend' students or their parents. His argument was several of the parents were personal friends.

Seems as though social networks are a free for all. I belong to Facebook but I rarely post & don't check out the site for weeks at a time. Some people I know spend hours everyday playing games & posting. I guess I don't "get" the attraction.

As far as cyber bullying... One should be able to report posts & have them removed, much like these iV boards operate.

Teachers' Facebook pages face scrutiny in Reeths-Puffer

http://www.mlive.com/news/muskegon/index.ssf/2011/03/teachers_facebook_pages_face_s.html

How Far Can Schools Go in Regulating Teachers' Social-Media Use?

http://www.edweek.org/dd/articles/2011/03/15/26mct_socmedia.h30.html


 


Photobucket&nbs

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-30-2002



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Community Leader
Registered: 01-25-2010

Tort law does not apply to minors.

Goldfish