Four factions in the Middle East:

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-30-2004
Four factions in the Middle East:
6
Fri, 06-13-2014 - 1:28pm

      The following is the way I see things, however, I certainly could be mistaken.

      The first faction is the anti-western intervention faction.  This faction is not so much against Non-Muslims as it is Non-Muslims intervening in Muslim lands.  This would include Anti-Zionists and the most well known advocate of this faction would be Osama bin Laden.

      The next two factions are the Sunni and Shiite factions.  The center of the Sunni faction would seem to be Saudi Arabia and the center of the Shiite faction would seem to be Iran.  The current trouble in Syria and Iraq seems to be a fight between these two factions and may result in Iran becoming friendlier with the United States and Europe. 

      The fourth faction is the pro-democratic faction.  While this group is currently the weakest it still is a factor and to the extent that events in the Middle East parallel those of Europe from the 16th to the 20th centuries it will be the faction that eventually dominates.

      Tom,

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-30-2004
Sun, 06-15-2014 - 12:48pm

      What is happening now in the Middle East is not without precedence.  There were the European religious wars of the 16th and 17th centuries in which Catholics fought Protestants.  Also, democracy did not always develop quickly and without problems in parts of the world other than the Middle East.  For example when the United States was first formed in 1776 most adults could not vote.  Further slavery existed.  The Civil War was a disastrous event in the history of the United States.  I do not see that the peoples of the Middle East are fundamentally different than the peoples of the nations that have been successful in providing an environment of democracy, tolerance and freedom of speech.  Many of the nations of the Middle East are actually quite new having been controlled by the Ottoman Empire and other nations into the 20th century.

      Tom

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-08-2011
Sun, 06-15-2014 - 5:55pm

There is a major faction you forgot to mention: the US perpetration.

838. Iraq crisis (6/14/2014)

 

All of a sudden, Iraq is in crisis. The second biggest city is fallen. Baghdad is threatened. 

 

Quote:
Iraqi soldiers, police drop weapons, flee posts in portions of Mosul

 

 

CNN, Fri June 13, 2014

 

"I only ... saw armed people, but not Iraqi military," said resident Firas al-Maslawi of his drive through Mosul on Tuesday. "There was no presence of any government forces on the streets, the majority of their posts destroyed and manned by (Islamist militants)."

 

The numerous reports of police and soldiers running from their posts in Mosul raised the prospect that the Iraqi government did not either have the will or resources to win this and other fights.

 

http://www.cnn.com/2014/06/10/world/meast/iraq-violence/

 

 

Iraqi security forces, trained by Pentagon for years and well equipped with helicopters, tanks and armoured cars, vastly outnumber the jihadists, suddenly melted down in the face of ISIL rebels.

 

Consider Al Qaeda jihadists are created and supported by the US to deal with its dislikes (such like Libya’s Gaddafi and Syria’s Assad) and the current Iraq government is a puppet set up by US in Iraq war, both sides are US’ assets. I think it’s a drama conducted by the US. You can see the leadership of Iraqi troops gave up the city without any fight.

 

Quote:
ISIS butchers leave 'roads lined with decapitated police and soldiers'

 

BySam Greenhilland Jill Reillyand Kieran Corcoran     12 June 2014

 

 

According to bitter Iraqi foot soldiers, their commanders slipped away in the night rather than mount a defence of the city.

 

One said: ‘Our leaders betrayed us. The commanders left the military behind. When we woke up, all the leaders had left.’

 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2655977/ISIS-militants-march-Baghdad-trademark-bullet-head-gets-way-control-north.html#ixzz34ZB9A5qo 

 

US inside group used to create a case, with which to ask for more power and money. E.g. the 911 attack has been created to get Patriot Act and two wars in Mid-East. What is it now for this Iraq crisis?

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-30-2004
Mon, 06-16-2014 - 9:42am

      Thank you for replying.  You’re right the United States can be seen as a faction in the Middle East, but it is not a faction that is native to the Middle East.  Currently President Obama is trying to reduce US presence in the Middle East.  As to the rest of what you wrote I am not quite sure of your point, but it seems to be a diversion from the subject of this thread.  I am not going to get into a long discussion with you over something that is a diversion from my main point.

      Tom,

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-30-2004
Tue, 06-17-2014 - 2:28pm

      Four nations in the Middle East have Muslim populations that are more than half Shiite.  These are Iran, Iraq, Azerbaijan and Bahrain.  In the rest of the nations of the Middle East more than half of the Muslim populations are Sunni.  Syria is mostly Sunni, but Bashar al-Assad, the President of Syria is Alawite Muslim.  The Alawite population in Syria is located mainly in the west along the Mediterranean coast.  Christians are also mainly located in that area while Kurds are located to the northeast and northwest and Shiites are located near Damascus and the border with Lebanon. 

      The Shiite population in Iraq is located primarily in the southeast near the border with Iran.  The Kurds who are also Sunni are located primarily in the northeast, while the Arab Sunni population is located mainly in the northwest.  Sunni and Shiite Arabs overlap in the south.  The area where the fighting is currently happening is in the predominately Sunni Arab region of the Northwest.

      Tom,

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-30-2004
Wed, 06-18-2014 - 3:43pm

      I feel that recent history (going back to World War II) shows two important concepts.  One is that the greatest violence and harm that has stemmed from the events in the Middle East has, by far, been to the Muslins and Arabs of the Middle East.  They are the ones that have suffered the most.

      To fully understand the second it is important to go back to the start of the Iraq War in 2003.  At that time many people in President Bush’s administration, but also outside of it, believed that Saddam Hussein had stockpiles of weapons of mass destruction.  I believe that these people truly believed that was the case and that these weapons pose a serious threat.  But, that was incorrect.  There were no stockpiles of weapons of mass destruction.  What this shows is that no matter how certain someone may be about the Middle East they could be wrong.  I feel this is not just the case for Americans and Europeans, but also for the people of the Middle East.

      Tom,

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-30-2004
Fri, 06-20-2014 - 6:22pm

      “Freedom House” an organization that has been monitoring freedom in the world since 1972 considers Iraq’s status as of 2013 as being “Not Free.”  It scores, for that same year, Political Rights in Iraq at “5” and scores Civil Liberties in that nation at “6,” with “7” being the score indicating the least Political Rights and Civil Liberties and “1” being the score indicating the most of those qualities.  In its most recent summary of the situation in Iraq Freedom House states that “Iraq is not an electoral democracy” and that “Although it has conducted meaningful elections, political participation and decision-making in the country remain seriously impaired by sectarian and insurgent violence, widespread corruption, and the influence of foreign powers.”  Freedom House’s latest “Freedom Rating” for Iraq with “1” being the best and “7” being the worst is 5.5, which is the same as that given for Russia.   

      Tom,