Gay Marriage in NYS

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-15-2007
Gay Marriage in NYS
24
Thu, 06-16-2011 - 7:18am

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-18-2000
Thu, 06-16-2011 - 8:08am

:smileyhappy: At last joining other North Eastern states!

 


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iVillage Member
Registered: 04-07-2002
Thu, 06-16-2011 - 11:38am
While we have Domestic Partnerships here, we still have enough of a population of 'conservatives' to keep voting down same-sex marriage. Just peeves me no end!! Hope NY joins the other NE states!!!

 nwtreehugger  

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-15-2007
Thu, 06-16-2011 - 12:31pm

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-07-2011
Thu, 06-16-2011 - 1:18pm
Weird, because I thought Washington state was a very liberal state and the liberals outnumbered the conservatives.

Perhaps not all liberals are for same sex marriage? It would seem unreasonable in a state with more liberals than conservatives to blame this soley on conservatives.
iVillage Member
Registered: 08-30-2002
Thu, 06-16-2011 - 11:08pm

I didn't find Wa to be liberal. It has liberal enclaves, but a large number of conservatives.



iVillage Member
Registered: 06-07-2011
Fri, 06-17-2011 - 8:02pm
((I didn't find Wa to be liberal))

Washington state consistently ranks in the top 10 liberal states. It is totally a "blue" state when it comes to voting. If "all" the liberals in the state wanted gay marriage to pass, it would. There are not enough conservatives to vote against it if "all" the liberals voted for it. Therefore, it would seem reasonable to conclude that either not all liberals are voting for it, or they just don't care enough about the issue to vote.

http://www.gallup.com/poll/146348/Mississippi-Rates-Conservative-State.aspx
(I hope this link works)
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-18-2000
Sat, 06-18-2011 - 10:15am

From your link......

>"The top 10 rankings make clear that conservative identification is much more common than liberal identification, with each of the top 10 conservative states at or above 45% identification and only the District of Columbia exceeding 31% liberal identification. In the nation as a whole, Americans are about twice as likely to identify as conservative as they are to identify as liberal, a pattern that has persisted for many years. Americans are also more likely to say they are conservative than moderate.

Not surprisingly, then, conservatives outnumber liberals in every U.S. state. Only in the District of Columbia do liberal identifiers exceed conservative identifiers (41% to 18%). Vermont (30.7% conservative to 30.5% liberal), Rhode Island (29.9% to 29.3%), and Massachusetts (29.9% to 28.0%) have the closest state-level division between conservatives and liberals. (The full data on ideology by state can be found on page 2 of this report.)"<

 


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iVillage Member
Registered: 04-07-2002
Sat, 06-18-2011 - 12:48pm
Actually, our state is more 'purple'...has been for some time. It's about 50/50 - with the large metropolitan areas tending towards liberalism & the small, rural areas towards conservatism. The east side of the state tends to be 'red', while the west side, with the exception of Clark county to the southwest, tends to be 'blue'.

All the votes are very close, FYI. What I find amusing is that, periodically, with the loss of a close election, the east side of my state starks squawking about 'ceding' from the west side. Us west siders say "SEE YA!"...but they never leave because they can't survive without our tax dollars. Kinda funny...all those conservatives needing our liberal tax dollars! ;)

There are plenty of conservatives in my state, and from the history of this issue, we've had too many out-of-state conservative scare groups come in & get those who don't normally vote to do so.

 nwtreehugger  

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-07-2002
Sat, 06-18-2011 - 12:51pm
No it's not!! Sheesh! Maybe when you're looking at Presidential elections alone but for other elections...nope...not so much! There are more conservatives than liberals in my state - but they only seem to vote on certain issues.

 nwtreehugger  

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-18-2000
Tue, 06-21-2011 - 8:06am

I strongly support gay marriage but religious organizations that don't should be able to refuse to marry anyone they choose, IMO.

Update:

In the balance: NY senators stuck on gay marriage

http://xfinity.comcast.net/articles/news-general/20110620/US.Gay.Marriage.NY/

Amped-up rhetoric aside and with seemingly little regard for the national microscope being trained on them, lawmakers in New York will go back to the office Tuesday with the galvanizing issue of gay marriage still unresolved after more than a week of shrieking headlines and backdoor negotiations.

In the true essence of Albany, politicians in this nearly 400-year-old city will bargain and bicker over a host of seemingly unconnected issues as gay couples and other states watch closely for indications about which way the national debate is evolving over using the word "marriage" to describe the union between people of the same sex.

Rent control for New York City apartment dwellers will come up. Same, too, for a cap on the amount of taxes municipalities can raise each year. All are set against the backdrop of what national advocates call a basic human right and what opponents call an assault on the religious sanctity of legal marriage between a man and a woman.

There was little progress Monday, even as hundreds of chanting protesters from each side of the highly charged debate in New York tried to make their case. The key sticking point appears to be how much freedom to grant religious groups who protest gay marriage and refuse to perform services or provide related functions like wedding receptions.

 


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