Good News, Gas Prices are going up:

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-15-2007
Good News, Gas Prices are going up:
124
Mon, 04-18-2011 - 12:19pm

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-03-2009
Tue, 05-10-2011 - 12:29am

I think Ohearto is right.

Jabberwocka

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-07-2002
Tue, 05-10-2011 - 1:12pm
I fully support walking or using alternative forms of transportation. We have 3 cars...but that wasn't until DD started college. She needs her own car to get to the Transit Center. But, when she was in high school, DH dropped her off on his way to work every day & I would time my errands to pick her up most days (depending on her after-school activities). If the weather was decent, she'd opt to walk the 2+ miles home. We weren't 'far enough away' to qualify for a school bus. Plus, now in our school district, only elementary level kids are provided with school buses. All other kids have to either ride Metro (they get a pass from the district) or provide their own transportation because the district can't afford the buses anymore!

I agree - think & combine trips as best as possible. I look at my week & decide when I'm going to go where depending on appointments, etc. I also take Metro whenever possible - especially going downtown.

And our gas prices never reached $4/gallon. They should be going down...but we'll see. As usual, the price of gasoline was artificially inflated by speculators buying up large quantities.

 nwtreehugger  

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-09-2001
Tue, 05-10-2011 - 2:30pm

Yes, I agree, it's all relative to the particular person and his/her circumstances, as well as the characteristics of the geographical locations in which he/she may live. What works as an adaption for one may not work for another... It's good to share how we each deal with transportation issues because even if one person's solution won't work in another's geographic circumstances, some of the ideas can be adapted and creative solutions might come. :)

I notice that in the downtowns of cities in our area they are rebuilding, with apts. on upper floors, stores and restaurants on the ground floor, parking garages underneath, but limited to one car per apt. Near rapid transit trains and bus stops/routes. So, there is a recognition that in some geographical locations, at least, alternative ways to try to get people out of their cars, and to make living without a car, reasonable and possible. There are even car "kiosks" near transit stations in some of our nearby cities, where one can rent a car for an hour or two or a weekend or a day, to do errands one cannot do using public transit or walking. So, people "share" cars instead of having to own their own. KEWL! They even have bicycle kiosks. So, creative solutions/adaptations are being tried successfully. :P Still, in past generations, like you said, often one had all the stores one needed local, within walking distance, and only need buses or cars for things further away, like maybe doctors' offices and so on. But that living without a car was easily do-able. Now, after all the decades of housing developments in the suburbs and so forth, the flow of people wanting to get out of the city, into residential neighborhoods, has broken down all that convenient location of important things nearby, like grocery stores, drug stores, etc. Now we are cycling back in the other direction, but of course, the already built areas during the "flight to the suburbs" still exist in great quantities, often without any bus service whatsoever, and nothing within walking distance, and jobs many, many miles away.

So, where the jobs are can determine the need for a car if there is no local infrastructure of public transportation or jobs are too far away to walk or bicycle. It's all very relative to geography as well as what our society values as an ideal "lifestyle," including our love affairs with cars. Even if they are pitching all the hybrids these days, they are still pushing the love affair and value that everyone needs a vehicle. All the glamor of the TV ads for vehicles vs. no glamor of using public transit, or learning to live without a car, and all the choices that would necessitate: limiting job choices, where one lives, etc. Fascinating to contemplate what our urban areas might look like a thousand years from now...and remembering many scifi movies and TV series that showed people using alternate transportation to our beloved cars. Moving sidewalks, etc. :P


Blessings,

Gypsy

)O(



iVillage Member
Registered: 04-07-2002
Wed, 05-11-2011 - 2:16pm
You're very correct! It's great to share our experiences/adaptations. That's how new solutions are arrived at!

My city has been building 'urban hubs' in various areas within the city limits. High density housing above retail spaces with contained parking garages. They are easy walking distance to shopping, bus routes, schools, parks. Downtown has seen a resurgance - however, most of those living spaces tend to be pretty darned expensive. Our current mayor has gone bicycle-lane-'sharrow' route happy...which, at this point is actually causing more problem than it's alleviating...but we'll see how that pans out.

 nwtreehugger  

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