Gulf Oil Spill Boondoggle

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-04-2010
Gulf Oil Spill Boondoggle
7
Thu, 12-16-2010 - 1:39pm
iVillage Member
Registered: 11-11-2010
Thu, 12-16-2010 - 3:26pm

Gosh....almost as bad as the TRILLION dollar "stimulus" boondoggle.

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-04-2010
Thu, 12-16-2010 - 3:37pm
What's your opinion on the article? Are you outraged that Jindal pushed and pushed for these sand berms instead of listening to all the scientists who said it wasn't going to work?
iVillage Member
Registered: 11-11-2010
Thu, 12-16-2010 - 5:39pm
Am I outraged? No. As far as I could see Jindal was the only one that was taking some sort of action. It's so easy to play arm-chair Monday morning quarterback, isn't it?
iVillage Member
Registered: 11-04-2010
Thu, 12-16-2010 - 5:56pm
doctorzip wrote:
Am I outraged? No. As far as I could see Jindal was the only one that was taking some sort of action. It's so easy to play arm-chair Monday morning quarterback, isn't it?
There was plenty of action going on.
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-19-2008
Thu, 12-16-2010 - 8:41pm

Wasn't the purpose of the berms to keep oil out of wetlands? If there was no oil recovered, maybe they did their job.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-18-2000
Fri, 12-17-2010 - 8:06am

In Louisiana, for decades, it's been one bad decision after another. Unfortunately the gas & oil companies trump the environment.

>"It took a while, but the prevailing narrative is finally starting to reflect that Katrina was a man-made disaster, not a natural disaster, triggered by shoddy engineering, not an overwhelming hurricane. Even the stubborn generals of the Army Corps of Engineers eventually admitted the "catastrophic failure" of the city's defenses. Now the U.S. is spending $15 billion to build sturdier flood walls and stronger pumps in smarter locations; the Army Corps even shut down the misbegotten Mississippi River Gulf Outlet, a little-used navigation canal that intensified Katrina's surge and ushered it into New Orleans."<

>"And while Louisiana's politicians continue to clamor for restoration, they're also pushing new billion-dollar levees that would further degrade the coast. And they're still essentially functioning as taxpayer-funded petroleum lobbyists. "Our delegation has always marched in lockstep on oil and gas issues," says former Congressman Chris John, who is now an actual petroleum lobbyist, the president of the influential Louisiana Mid-Continent Oil & Gas Association. "That's not going to change a bit."

The Petro-State
"this is crippling us! Devastating us!" Ewell Smith was outraged. He represented Louisiana's seafood industry, and three months after the BP blowout, oil was still cascading into the Gulf. But Smith wasn't outraged about the spill; he was outraged by President Obama's moratorium on new deepwater drilling — and he was speaking out at a drill-baby-drill "Rally for Economic Survival" at the Cajundome in Lafayette. "Oil and gas is a way of life down here, just like fishing," he explained later. "The fishermen all have brothers and cousins on the rig. Or they'll work the rigs between seasons. Everyone supports the industry."

Everyone sure did at the rally — Democrats and Republicans, the former president of Shell Oil and current president of the Louisiana Restaurant Association, even Cherri Foytlin, the author of a children's coloring book about coastal erosion. Foytlin spoke lyrically about vanishing wetlands — "the earth is dead there" — but quickly pivoted to her husband's work on a rig. "The spill makes us sad," she said. "The moratorium makes us mad!"

The journalist A.J. Liebling once described Louisiana as "the westernmost of the Arab states," and it remains an article of faith in Louisiana politics that what's good for oil and gas — along with the petrochemical industry and other related businesses — is good for the state.

 


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