Health Care Ruling:

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-15-2007
Health Care Ruling:
79
Sat, 08-13-2011 - 4:11pm

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iVillage Member
Registered: 12-16-2004
Thu, 08-18-2011 - 4:36am

Well lack of

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-15-2007
Thu, 08-18-2011 - 9:30am

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-15-2007
Thu, 08-18-2011 - 9:35am

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-15-2007
Thu, 08-18-2011 - 9:39am

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-18-2000
Thu, 08-18-2011 - 10:17am

"CBO did not state that all other industrialized countries are less likely to include very premature birth in their infant mortality statistics and the CBO did not state that the differences in the infant mortality statistics are solely due to the differences in reporting. So, while some statistical reports from some nations may not be completely comparable to those from the United States the CBO is not saying that all are not completely comparable."

Thank you for pointing that out.

I have found many have an over inflated sense of national pride that only the US has it's act together. Though I find is annoying I generally shrug it off. (For example the "freedom fry" fiasco.)

 


Photobucket&nbs

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-16-2004
Thu, 08-18-2011 - 10:22am

Thank you Tom,

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-18-2000
Thu, 08-18-2011 - 10:34am

The last thing one needs when having health problems is to worry how to pay for the treatment or even to make an appointment. Stress is not conducive to healing.

A friend, a widow, spent all their retirement saving on her husband's health problems. They own a nice house so very little help was available.

 


Photobucket&nbs

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-16-2004
Thu, 08-18-2011 - 10:57am

I well I have already lost American friends to cancer that could have been cured here

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-27-2009
Thu, 08-18-2011 - 2:37pm
I'm sorry, I've tried to respond 3 times now to your post and I can't. I really don't understand your point. It appears that you have made some assumptions about US health care delivery, and education that I think may be false.

I do have some questions for you, how does the physician or dietitian ensure that the patient and/or parents follow through with the education they receive. What does the education on a diet plan look like in Sweden? Who is responsible for follow through with patients and how frequent is that contact?

Just so you understand my pov. I know that the US health care system could be better. All counties could improve. I do think that access is an important factor, and while no one is denied care in an ER in the US, it is a very inefficient way to receive health services. I am also of the opinion that chronic care education and follow through could be much better. Health care is not health insurance- another poster already did an excellent job of explaining the differences there. Health care needs to be paid for whether the system is universal; publicly financed or private; or a combination of both public and private as in the. In order to keep costs low there are a limited number of cost containment measures that can be implemented. Cost containment is accomplished though limiting resources, something seen in countries with universal systems, and even in some extent in the US. In universal systems the government determines how much equipment is going to be available (ex. MRI's, surgical robots, and other technologies), They determine which procedures are cost effective and will allowed, (in some countries the patient can still opt for uncovered procedures at their cost). the number and variety of pharmaceuticals are limited. Co-pays and other out of pocket costs are increased. As you already know, Sweden has an extremely high out of pocket cost at 98.2% (it's 24.4% in the US). (www.globalhealthfacts.org)
Other ways of cost containment in universal systems is to limited compensation. The government determines how much it will cost for pharmaceuticals, procedures and interventions and Dr.s' fees. Incentives are also offered to patients through lower out of pocket costs if they use a gatekeeper physician. The gatekeeping system is set that the patient must see their GP first before seeing specialists. There is good and bad about this system. As we found i t the US with the HMO system that functions this way is that consumers weren't always so happy about being denied specialist referrals, testing, and other interventions because the Dr's task is to keep costs low, and that can only be done by limiting expenses, ie. intervention. The hospital systems vary, often the patient does not have the option of seeking treatment at any hospital but instead the one in their region.
Other countries also benefit from the innovation in the US health care market. Innovation is expensive. It takes $ for R&D that can often go now where- money gone. New technologies are expensive in the beginning, just like electronic devices- when first introduced into the market they cost more, as use increases, the costs go down). One example of this is pharmaceuticals, if I can find the article I'll post it. Switzerland has experienced an impact on pharmaceuticals as their health care system has expanded further toward a public funded universal system.
I could go on, but I fear I am boring everyone.

My opinion is that the best way to improve the health, and the health care system statistics is to improve prevention and chronic care and probably most importantly; influence behavior/cultural changes. Preventable chronic health care conditions are responsible for a lions share of health care costs. Preventing illness is preferable to catching it early from screening. Preventing illness requires behavior changes. The question is how to motivate people to change. Screenings don't encourage change, and gives a false feeling of security to patients. If interested, here is a link to the Republican Senators meeting on health care reform during the debate in the US. Unfortunately it received little attention, and I don't know that "Obamacare" addressed preventing illness as much as it focused on providing free early detection screenings which prevent nothing. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PJymZEk08aY
I'll end with this: consider Obesity and smoking.
Smoking is 100% behavioral making lung disease, cardiovascular disease, and cancer associated with this behavior 100% preventable.
Obesity- I'm unable to find a statistic, however, while genetics or medical issues such as Prader-Willi Syndrome and Poly-cystic Ovary Disease do contribute to obesity rates, that % is small and literature suggests that the vast amount of cases of obesity are behavioral. Disease caused by obesity- there are way to many many to list so I'll go in systems and give an example- psychiatric (depression), neurological (stroke), endocrine (diabetes), reproductive (infertility), cardio-vascular (hypertension), gastrointestinal (reflux), kidney (renal disease), respiratory (obstructive sleep apnea), muscular-skeletal (joint degeneration, arthritis).
If in the US we took an innovative approach to changing behavior, we could make a huge difference in health care costs. We have changed our paradigm regarding smoking. People don't often think twice about saying a negative word about a smoker and their drifting smoke in public areas and have no issue with asking/telling someone to stop and move. However, when it comes to unhealthy eating it's a different story. Society is telling us to accept people as they are, love your body God gave you, weight doesn't matter. And from a social perspective those sentiments are correct. From a health perspective, those sentiments are wrong and dismiss the significance and impact of overeating, chronic unhealthy eating, and an unhealthy lifestyle.

Sorry if I bored you, I'm a bit passionate about this as I believe we have it wrong to think that screening is the answer and providing free 15 minute well check ups. To be clear, I'm not diminishing the importance of screening and well check ups, but it doesn't even scratch the surface in making a difference of Chronic care management or Prevention.

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-27-2009
Thu, 08-18-2011 - 2:59pm
Thank you Tom
You seem to have taken my comments further than I did.
The CBO's report supports exactly what I said.

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