High-Tech Flirting Turns Explicit, Altering Young Lives

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-18-2000
High-Tech Flirting Turns Explicit, Altering Young Lives
10
Sun, 03-27-2011 - 10:36am

A lesson learnt the hard way.

The mean spirited manner the ex-friend treated the victim is deplorable.

One day last winter Margarite posed naked before her bathroom mirror, held up her cellphone and took a picture. Then she sent the full-length frontal photo to Isaiah, her new boyfriend.

Both were in eighth grade.

They broke up soon after. A few weeks later, Isaiah forwarded the photo to another eighth-grade girl, once a friend of Margarite’s. Around 11 o’clock at night, that girl slapped a text message on it............

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/27/us/27sexting.html?ref=homepage&src=mv&pagewanted=all

 


Photobucket&nbs

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-05-2011
This is a problem of technology being in the hands of children who are inherently immature. Prosecuting minors as sex offenders doesn't seem appropriate to me. The article goes on to say 24% of high school students admit to some form of naked sexting.

Are we going to prosecute 24% of our high school students?
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-18-2000

Out of curiosity what browser are you using? Obviously you can read my post......
I use both Windows 7 &/or Firefox. In Windows I can't see my original post, or any following posts, in this thread. I've had this problem before it appears to be intermittent. Thanks.

 


Photobucket&nbs

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-05-2011
I am using internet explorer, I think it's version 8. My PC is Windows 7 64 something.
Avatar for missy_vixen
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-19-2003
I read this as well and I think it's just crazy ... I agree that easy access to technology that can disseminate information so quickly and broadly is a dangerous combination for young teens that aren't really known for their consideration of consequences. So sad, really. I also think this generation's definition of privacy is vastly different than those that came before. It's really amazing how the prevalent amount of technology is creating a mindshift in a whole generation, in some ways. And this is both good and bad. Unfortunately, as the story also outlined, I don't think a lot of parents understand or are equipped to help guide their kids through these new pitfalls.
Missy :)
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-03-2009

Composed on a "smart" phone--which wasn't smart enough to allow me to edit it!

Jabberwocka

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-03-2009
There aren't very many taboos anymore.

Seems as though Tweens don't understand how their actions have irrevocable consequences.

Technology without limits of some sort in their hands is extremely hazardous.

Jabberwocka

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-18-2000
This problem appears to be intermittent. It's frustrating to say the least.

 


Photobucket&nbs

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-18-2000

"I also think this generation's definition of privacy is vastly different than those that came before."

I agree. Growing-up I rarely discussed prior boyfriends with the present beau & didn't wish to know of his conquests, if any. Now everything is out there. No mystic.

"I don't think a lot of parents understand or are equipped to help guide their kids through these new pitfalls."

There needs to be trust between parent & child at the same time be vigilant. A fine line indeed.

 


Photobucket&nbs

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-18-2000

A good reputation was valued now it's as though some teens don't

 


Photobucket&nbs

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-09-2001
missy_vixen wrote:
I read this as well and I think it's just crazy ... I agree that easy access to technology that can disseminate information so quickly and broadly is a dangerous combination for young teens that aren't really known for their consideration of consequences. So sad, really. I also think this generation's definition of privacy is vastly different than those that came before. It's really amazing how the prevalent amount of technology is creating a mind-shift in a whole generation, in some ways. And this is both good and bad. Unfortunately, as the story also outlined, I don't think a lot of parents understand or are equipped to help guide their kids through these new pitfalls.


I agree. With the technology available in most cell smartphones these days, even adults abuse and misuse them. And essentially children, without emotional maturity and control, acting on a whim whichever way the wind and their peers blow them? And having really no concept of just how nasty or cruel some people can be? Yikes! :smileysurprised: The easy ability to use the Internet and photos as weapons to damage or hurt another human being makes it hard for adults, parents, to supervise. Or foresee an "attack" coming and so protect their child. Let alone combat the insidious flood of information coming at their children, once their "mainlined" into the Net and cell phone use. We have convinced ourselves that cell phones are absolutely necessary to stay in touch with our kids when they are away from us. And in doing so, we unintentionally may put them in harm's way. Unfortunately, tools created to benefit get abused and misused. Maybe that is part of what we must try to teach our children in this "connected to everything and everyone age?" To not trust too easily; to define what "private" information only for family or long trusted friends is, vs. whatever is for "public consumption" or just any classmate? Share some of the scary stories like this, so they know the horrible possibilities if they trust the wrong people? When bullying enters the Internet and smartphones, also, it can lead to suicides and self-harm for the targeted. What was once considered such wonderful tools, the Internet, computers, smartphones, has been perverted by users who choose to harm others. Perhaps a new cell phone has to be available that parents can "program" like they can access to TV stations or internet sites at home? Recognize the innocuous little cell phone can allow information just as harmful? And teach our children like we do about the hot stove, or crossing a street, etc.? And if we don't know enough, find out ourselves, so we *can* teach our children about responsible use as well as possible harm? hmm.gif



Blessings,

Gypsy

)O(