NBC omits "key" words from pledge before U.S. Open, issues apology.

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-07-2011
NBC omits "key" words from pledge before U.S. Open, issues apology.
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Sun, 06-19-2011 - 9:04pm
This is unbelievable.

http://sports.yahoo.com/golf/blog/devil_ball_golf/post/NBC-apologizes-for-omitting-under-God-from-ple?urn=golf-wp2901

Sun Jun 19 03:24pm EDT

NBC apologizes for omitting ‘under God’ from pledge before U.S. Open
By Jay Busbee

Follow Jay Busbee on Twitter at @jaybusbee.
Rory McIlroy has almost certainly drained all the drama out of the on-course play at the U.S. Open. But outside the ropes, NBC led off its telecast with an immediately controversial pre-taped segment. Listen to the pledge of allegiance that runs alongside the patriotic images, and later to the one that overlays video of previous U.S. Open winners:

In case it's been awhile since you said the pledge in elementary school, the first version left out the words "under God" and "indivisible." The second went even further, knocking out "one nation" as well.
The outcry on Twitter was immediate and almost universally negative. Perhaps this style was an artistic choice on the part of the segment producer, interweaving the pledge with military and golf-related sound bites, but the decision to leave out "under God" is a curious one at best, and a highly controversial one, without doubt.
Later in the telecast, host Dan Hicks read the following statement during coverage: "It was our intent to begin our coverage of this U.S. Open championship with a feature that captured the patriotism of our national championship being here in our nation's capital for the third time. Regrettably, a portion of the pledge of allegiance that was in that feature was edited out. It was not done to upset anyone and we'd like to apologize to those of you who were offended by it."
Of note: "under God" was not in the original pledge from 1892, which read, "I pledge allegiance to my Flag and the Republic for which it stands, one nation, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all." The words "under God" were not added to the pledge until 1954, when President Eisenhower signed Congressional legislation to that effect into law.
Related: Rory McIlroy





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iVillage Member
Registered: 05-03-2011

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Jehovah's Witnesses absolutely forbid reciting the Pledge. Some kids come from atheist families who don't believe in God. The schools I've been in, the kids stand, but they don't have to recite the Pledge. I find the whole Pledge idea silly myself.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-03-2011
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Too bad so many others do.>>

How does reciting the Pledge teach children to be respectful of their country, flag, and most especially "honor those that have died for their freedom"? I learned all that by learning the history of our country. Not reciting the Pledge doesn't make one unpatriotic. I also find it interesting that adults (except for teachers) aren't in the habit of reciting the Pledge on a regular basis, or even on an infrequent basis. The only place I've run into reciting the Pledge as an adult is in the schools.
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-07-2011
(( I find the whole Pledge idea silly myself))

I don't see anything silly about it. There is nothing wrong with stating your allegiance to your country, and honoring those who have died to make this great country what it is. Too bad so many are not proud of their country, don't feel the need to honor it and couldn't care less about the flag and and what the flag represents.

What's even worse is that NBC chooses to cater to this extremely radical group of haters who are "offended" at the mention of the word "God" and therefore they feel that nobody else should be allowed to say it. What a disgrace, I hope somebody loses their job over that, but I'm sure they will probably get a big raise instead, knowing NBC.
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-07-2011
(( The only place I've run into reciting the Pledge as an adult is in the schools.))

Wow, really? We do it before most major baseball games, NASCAR races, hockey games, rodeos, and football games, along with the Star Spangled Banner.

I see reciting the pledge as something similar to saying grace before supper. It is giving respect and thanks for being fortunate enough to live in this great country where we have the freedom to go to school everyday, gather for special events, etc. We say grace befor supper to give thanks for the good fortune bestowed upon our family. Some of this good fortune was because of those who have died to make this country what it is. I have no problem reciting the pledge, singing the National Anthem, or saying grace before supper. And it just is crazy to think that some would be offended by that.
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-03-2009

Phooey. Nothing about the pledge honors those who have died in our wars or conflicts; whether defensive or of aggression. I would really like to know more about how that line could be LOGICALLY argued! Moreover, the pledge itself is a relict of medieval times when serfs pledged fealty to their overlords.

Since not all citizens of the U.S. believe in God, I think the emphasis on "under God" is a blurring of the line between church and state.

The disgrace lays in conflating the mouthing of words with either devout faith, or heeding the responsibilities of citizenship.

Jabberwocka

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-03-2011
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I'm still waiting to hear how reciting the Pledge honors those military men and women who have died in service to our country. Too bad so many people don't realize that one can absolutely love this country and not have to recite the Pledge to show it.
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-09-2001

iluvkrat wrote:

Jehovah's Witnesses absolutely forbid reciting the Pledge. Some kids come from atheist families who don't believe in God. The schools I've been in, the kids stand, but they don't have to recite the Pledge. I find the whole Pledge idea silly myself.


Exactly! As is practiced here, in public schools children are asked to stand respectfully, but do NOT have to say the Pledge. To force a child to do something their religion teaches them not to, is not patriotic at all. It's despicable and against the very foundations of religious freedom in our country, that supposed patriots should be defending and protecting, for EVERYONE.

To me being patriotic is supporting the same freedoms for everyone else that I want, and do enjoy, myself. And that includes supporting our soldiers, living and dead, who have fought for those freedoms for EVERYONE.


Blessings,

Gypsy

)O(



iVillage Member
Registered: 05-03-2011
The sporting events I've been to haven't had the Pledge, but did do the Star Spangled Banner.

The Pledge might mean a lot more if the people who really love the Pledge actually lived the principles in the words "invisible, with liberty and justice for all." I've noticed that the ones who are the most offended by NBC leaving it out are the same ones who fight to keep rights from specific groups of people and are the most partisan divisive people. To me, that makes the Pledge all the more meaningless.
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-30-2007

So then all those who learned the "Pledge" before 1954

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-07-2011
((I'm still waiting to hear how reciting the Pledge honors those military men and women who have died in service to our country. Too bad so many people don't realize that one can absolutely love this country and not have to recite the Pledge to show it.))

To pledge allegiance to the flag and to the republic for which it stands for.... The republic would not be what it is today without all the brave men and women who gave their lives defending our countries freedoms.

I didn't say that reciting the pledge means the same thing to all people. Just because some don't see the point in it, doesn't mean they can mock and ridicule others who find meaning in reciting the pledge. Reciting the pledge, for many, is showing respect, honor, and gratitude to our country. I just don't understand why so many have a problem with that.

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