Newt Gingrich's Freddie Mac work draws new scrutiny

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Registered: 03-18-2000
Newt Gingrich's Freddie Mac work draws new scrutiny
5
Thu, 11-17-2011 - 9:56am

 


Photobucket&nbs

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-18-2000

 


Photobucket&nbs

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-20-2011

I'm confused.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-13-2009
Who is saying what he did was illegal or unethical? But did he break with republican talking points on the purpose and merits of Freddie Mac and Fannie May? You betcha.
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-18-2000
Newt Gingrich, Professor of Lobbying http://www.vanityfair.com/online/daily/2011/11/Newt-Gingrich-Professor-of-Lobbying

A bombshell report in The New York Times casts doubt on Newt Gingrich’s childlike insistence that his post-Speakership years were not spent performing the duties of a common lobbyist but rather those of an historian. One of the Republican presidential candidate’s ambitiously-named extracurriculars was the Center for Health Transformation. For just $200,000, it provided clients with access to lawmakers, the opportunity to speak favorably of their services at government/business boy-girl mixers, and receive hollow compliments from Newt Gingrich. Gingrich’s reliably inarticulate spokesperson R. C. Hammond told the Times: “You have somebody who knows what he believes in, he can effectively communicate it, and he’s successful in doing it. God bless America.” God bless R. C. Hammond.

According to the paper, “Mr. Gingrich made a presentation to Republican lawmakers in Georgia, promoting the work of his member companies by citing specific benefits if they were hired. For example: ‘VitalSpring could save the State Employee Program over $20 million a year.’” There are a handful of other examples similar to this one, suggesting that Gingrich was indeed a historian who taught, for the price of four college semesters, a 100-level seminar on the history of lobbying.

 


Photobucket&nbs

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-20-2011

From your post:

""‘VitalSpring could save the State Employee Program over $20 million a year.’”