Snap, Crackle, Filth...Is Kellogg's the New Cereal Killer?

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-18-2000
Snap, Crackle, Filth...Is Kellogg's the New Cereal Killer?
9
Tue, 06-14-2011 - 2:26pm
Gross! This is the first I've heard of this. One would think they'd be extra careful with food children eat. Kellogg Gets Second FDA Warning on Listeria in 2 Years

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-06-14/kellogg-gets-second-fda-warning-on-listeria-in-2-years-1-.html

http://www.benzinga.com/general/politics/11/06/1166918/snap-crackle-filth-is-kelloggs-the-new-cereal-killer

It looks like the Special K might be more special than consumers intended it to be. In a shocking, graphically detailed letter, the FDA cited Kellogg's (NYSE: K) Augusta, Georgia plant for a series of health code and regulatory violations.

The most disgusting? Small swarms of flies inside the plant, including in and around food equipment. According to the FDA letter to Kellogg's, “Approximately twenty flies were observed exiting a drain located near spiral cooler (b)(4) and making contact with food contact surfaces. Approximately thirty flies were observed swarming in proximity of the flour sock of mixer (b)(4). Approximately eighty flies were observed after the back panel of mixer (b)(4) was removed.”

The flies were not the only serious health concern the FDA found at the plant. According to the letter, the FDA found strains of Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes) in no less than fifteen different locations inside the plant, indicating that the infection had spread throughout the plant.

Listeria monocytogenes is one of the most virulent foodborne pathogens, with 20 to 30 percent of clinical infections resulting in death. Responsible for approximately 2,500 illnesses and 500 deaths in the United States annually, listeriosis is the leading cause of death among foodborne bacterial pathogens, with fatality rates exceeding even Salmonella and Clostridium botulinum.

This is not the first time the FDA has visited the plant with concerns. They took swabs for bacteria back in January of 2010 and again in February of 2011, and found the same strain of Listeria across the plant both times. The report indicates this is a serious problem for Kellogg's.

“The presence of a persistent strain of L. monocytogenes in your facility between January 2010 and February 2011 is significant in that it demonstrates that your cleaning and sanitation efforts were inadequate to remove this organism. We note that although your finished product cookies may not support the growth of L. monocytogenes, the positive environmental swabs are indicators of insanitary conditions in your facility and demonstrate a failure of cleaning and sanitation operations that may allow for contamination of foods with filth or pathogens.”

Unsurprisingly, Kellogg's stock is seeing higher than average volume today as individuals sell the stock after the FDA warnings and regulatory violations.

 


Photobucket&nbs

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-09-2001
Call me cynical, but quality control costs $$$, with qualified vigilant staff. With the recession and companies looking to cut costs, this is no surprise. :|


Blessings,

Gypsy

)O(



iVillage Member
Registered: 06-07-2011
Ewwwwww!!

I swear, if you take just one microbiology class in college, you will wonder how on earth you have survived as long as you did. Lots of really gross bacteria out there.
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-07-2002
And I wondered why I don't like cereal.... ;) ICK! Hot mixed grain cereal...fine. Cold soggy cereal in milk? Noooo...

Seriously, this is disgusting...and I will think twice before purchasing any Kellogg's products in the future.

That said, I also think (although not int this case) that the American public is a little too germaphobic for it's own good too.

 nwtreehugger  

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-18-2000
"That said, I also think (although not int this case) that the American public is a little too germaphobic for it's own good too."

I agree. In the end it make one more vulnerable instead of having a natural immunity.

 


Photobucket&nbs

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-30-2002

There is a certain amount of "dockage" in all processed food. Bug parts,



iVillage Member
Registered: 03-30-2007

I keep flour and grains in the freezer.

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-05-2011
An interesting analysis of the news is over here http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-06-14/kellogg-gets-second-fda-warning-on-listeria-in-2-years-1-.html

Kellogg’s cookies are baked at a temperature high enough to kill any listeria present, according to Robert Gravani, a food science professor at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. The lack of an FDA product recall suggests that listeria was not found in the cookies, he said. FDA spokeswoman Tamara Ward declined to comment on a potential recall.

Listeria is a bacterium found in prepared foods and soil that can cause a serious infection in humans called listeriosis. It is particularly harmful to pregnant women, the young, the elderly, and people with weak immune systems, according to the FDA’s website.

Kellogg, the largest U.S. maker of breakfast cereals, fell 45 cents to $54.96 at 4 p.m. in New York Stock Exchange composite trading. The shares have gained 7.6 percent this year.

The FDA in January 2010 ordered Kellogg to improve sanitation controls at the different Georgia plant after Eggo buttermilk waffles were found contaminated with listeria bacteria. That, along with flooding and equipment changes at another waffle factory in 2009, slowed production for months and caused Eggo’s market share to drop.

Kellogg in June 2010 voluntarily recalled about 28 million boxes of cereal including Froot Loops and Honey Smacks, citing unusual taste and odor coming from the liner of packages. The recalled boxes were made at an Omaha, Nebraska, facility. North American cereal sales dropped 5 percent in 2010, partly because of the recall.
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-18-2000
There's an echo. ;) I had posted this link in my original post.

 


Photobucket&nbs

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-13-2009
I've heard of 20% in chocolate many, many years ago, but nothing near 50% in any product.

Do you have a link or something? (I only recently started grinding my own pepper! might have to stick with that)