USDA's 'pink slime' choice: Kids can have additive or more fat

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-18-2000
USDA's 'pink slime' choice: Kids can have additive or more fat
5
Thu, 03-15-2012 - 1:13pm

Yuck!

http://www.latimes.com/news/nation/nationnow/la-na-nn-pink-slime-usda-announcement-20120315,0,6500521.story

"Pink slime" -- the ground beef additive maligned by a celebrity chef and incorrectly depicted in an Internet image as a fluffy pink concoction resembling soft-serve ice cream -- may not be appearing on your child's lunch tray come fall.

And that would be news to celebrate were it not for a new study suggesting, as The Times recently reported, that all red meat is bad for you anyway.

A spokesman with the USDA'S Food Safety and Inspection Service confirmed to The Times that the U.S. Department of Agriculture will be making an announcement Thursday concerning the food additive and the national school lunch program.

An Associated Press report earlier in the day, citing an unnamed official at the USDA (apparently no one wants to be tainted by "pink slime"), said the agency would announce that schools will be able to choose between 95% lean beef patties made with the additive or bulk ground beef without it -- that is less lean.

Apparently, you can't have your non-pink-slime beef and have it be lean too.

Chef Jamie Oliver has said that what the USDA and the meat industry call "lean beef trimmings" really are "all of the bits that no one wants." Then ammonium hydroxide is mixed in to kill bacteria such as E. coli and salmonella.

Steven Cohen, director of media relations at the International Food Information Council, a Washington-based nonprofit backed by food, beverage and agricultural companies, recently provided some information about the

 


Photobucket&nbs

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-18-2000

Doesn't this sound 'appitizing'?....

>"The low-grade trimmings used to produce lean, finely textured beef come from the parts of the cow most susceptible to contamination, often close to the hide, which is highly exposed to fecal matter. But because of the treatment of the trimmings - after they have been simmered in low heat, separating fat and tissue using a centrifuge, they are sprayed with ammonia gas to kill germs – the USDA says it’s safe to eat."<
Excerp from....
‘It’s 100 Percent Beef’: Company on Defensive as It Closes Plants
http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/business/2012/03/its-100-percent-beef-company-on-defensive-as-it-closes-plants/ There's a video too at this link.




 


Photobucket&nbs

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-16-2008

For some reason, whenever my dd eats a school lunch, she ends up sick within a couple of days.

You know, she is not alone.

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-30-2002

I agree. For some reason, whenever my dd eats a school lunch, she ends up sick within a couple of days. We don't let her have them very often and it's not immediate, usually within two or three days. But it has always made me wonder. We are pretty healthy eaters, tend to eat organic as much as we can. I cook most of our meals. We buy whole grain breads and pasta. But it seems, that whenever I break down and let her get a school lunch, within a couple of days, she is home from school, sick.



iVillage Member
Registered: 10-17-2011

I have the very best solution to all this....Don't eat meat, its healthier and you dont risk unhelthy meals.

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-16-2008

So, which is worse -- leaner beef with the FDA-approved additive? Or the alternative?

Avoid school lunch all together, and hang onto homemade lunch with all your might so that the school lunch inspectors could not take it away!