Obama's Response????

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-04-2001
Obama's Response????
37
Tue, 01-25-2011 - 4:30pm
Do you suppose Obama
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-02-2009
Thu, 02-03-2011 - 11:30am

Support our allies and not our enemies" even when the ally is essentially a dictator and the people have had enough. What kind of "support" do you think we should be giving Mubarak? What do you think about the fact that the pro-Mubarak protesters have turned violent and have also been targeting reporters?

Verbal support would be enough. Mubarak is preferable to another regime like Iran. How do you know they are really Mubarack supporters attacking the reporters? Real Mubarack supporters should not be doing that.

"Resist, we much. We must, and we much. About that, be committed."

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-04-2010
Thu, 02-03-2011 - 11:34am
"Verbal support would be enough. Mubarak is preferable to another regime like Iran."

Verbal support such as what? Also, we have no idea what kind of government/leader would come after Mubarak. We just don't know and frankly, it's not our business to make those decisions for people. Look at the mess we've made doing that in the past...every single time.

"How do you know they are really Mubarack supporters attacking the reporters?"

That's pretty common knowledge...in all the reports coming out of Egypt.
iVillage Member
Registered: 11-04-2010
Thu, 02-03-2011 - 11:54am
"How do you know they are really Mubarack supporters attacking the reporters? Real Mubarack supporters should not be doing that."

Even the Egyptian government is apologizing for their violent supporters. http://www.foxnews.com/world/2011/02/03/gunfire-pounds-anti-mubarak-protest-camp-cairo/
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-04-2001
Thu, 02-03-2011 - 2:16pm

Obama's speech insisting on change "now" fed into the mob frenzy that is spreading throughout the region.

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-04-2010
Thu, 02-03-2011 - 2:23pm
From Free Republic? Good grief. If you'd like to understand what is happening in Egypt, there are much better places to get information from.
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-02-2009
Thu, 02-03-2011 - 11:45pm

Verbal support such as what? Also, we have no idea what kind of government/leader would come after Mubarak. We just don't know and frankly, it's not our business to make those decisions for people. Look at the mess we've made doing that in the past...every single time.

I didn't prepare a statement. We could send a carrier group, if you don't just want verbal support. We know we have an ally in Mubarack, I would expect the same from his successor.

"Resist, we much. We must, and we much. About that, be committed."

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-04-2010
Fri, 02-04-2011 - 7:09am
In other words, the Egyptian people should have no say in who their leaders are, and the U.S. should go to war if need be. I completely disagree. I never said I supported the MB and it appears that a lot of people in Egypt don't want the MB in charge. The MB came into the protests partway through. I'm sure they want to be part of the new government, but it is up to the Egyptian people to decide whether to allow that or not. We don't have a good track record of making good choices for other people, nor should we be in the business of doing so.
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-04-2001
Fri, 02-04-2011 - 1:15pm

No one has advocated the US going to war.

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-04-2010
Fri, 02-04-2011 - 1:21pm
"No one has advocated the US going to war."

I must have misunderstood "we could send a carrier group."

"What has been criticized is Obama's poorly thought out call for change "now" which fueled mob behavior, intensified the crisis, and delayed meaningful dialog about an orderly transition."

Uh, no. It's an interesting take, but no, that's not what happened.

The rest of your post? blah, blah, blah, Obama sucks, blah, blah.
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-04-2001
Fri, 02-04-2011 - 1:24pm

What others are saying:

The Arab revolution and Western decline By Ari Shavit
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Two huge processes are happening right before our eyes. One is the Arab liberation revolution. After half a century during which tyrants have ruled the Arab world, their control is weakening. After 40 years of decaying stability, the rot is eating into the stability. The Arab masses will no longer accept what they used to accept. The Arab elites will no longer remain silent.

Processes that have been roiling beneath the surface for about a decade are suddenly bursting out in an intifada of freedom. Modernization, globalization, telecommunications and Islamization have created a critical mass that cannot be stopped. The example of democratic Iraq is awakening others, and Al Jazeera's subversive broadcasts are fanning the flames. And so the Tunisian bastille fell, the Cairo bastille is falling and other Arab bastilles will fall.

The scenes are similar to the Palestinian intifada of 1987, but the collapse recalls the Soviet collapse in Eastern Europe of 1989. No one knows where the intifada will lead. No one knows whether it will bring democracy, theocracy or a new kind of democracy. But things will never again be the same.

The old order in the Middle East is crumbling. Just as the officers' revolution in the 1950s brought down the Arab monarchism that had relied on the colonial powers, the 2011 revolution in the square is bringing down the Arab tyrants who were dependent on the United States.

The second process is the acceleration of the decline of the West. For some 60 years the West gave the world imperfect but stable order. It built a kind of post-imperial empire that promised relative quiet and maximum peace. The rise of China, India, Brazil and Russia, like the economic crisis in the United States, has made it clear that the empire is beginning to fade.

And yet, the West has maintained a sort of international hegemony. Just as no replacement has been found for the dollar, none has been found for North Atlantic leadership. But Western countries' poor handling of the Middle East proves they are no longer leaders. Right before our eyes the superpowers are turning into palaver powers.

There are no excuses for the contradictions. How can it be that Bush's America understood the problem of repression in the Arab world, but Obama's America ignored it until last week? How can it be that in May 2009, Hosni Mubarak was an esteemed president whom Barack Obama respected, and in January 2011, Mubarak is a dictator whom even Obama is casting aside? How can it be that in June 2009, Obama didn't support the masses who came out against the zealot Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, while now he stands by the masses who are coming out against the moderate Mubarak?

There is one answer: The West's position is not a moral one that reflects a real commitment to human rights. The West's position reflects the adoption of Jimmy Carter's worldview: kowtowing to benighted, strong tyrants while abandoning moderate, weak ones.

Carter's betrayal of the Shah brought us the ayatollahs, and will soon bring us ayatollahs with nuclear arms. The consequences of the West's betrayal of Mubarak will be no less severe. It's not only a betrayal of a leader who was loyal to the West, served stability and encouraged moderation. It's a betrayal of every ally of the West in the Middle East and the developing world. The message is sharp and clear: The West's word is no word at all; an alliance with the West is not an alliance. The West has lost it. The West has stopped being a leading and stabilizing force around the world.

The Arab liberation revolution will fundamentally change the Middle East. The acceleration of the West's decline will change the world. One outcome will be a surge toward China, Russia and regional powers like Brazil, Turkey and Iran. Another will be a series of international flare-ups stemming from the West's lost deterrence. But the overall outcome will be the collapse of North Atlantic political hegemony not in decades, but in years. When the United States and Europe bury Mubarak now, they are also burying the powers they once were. In Cairo's Tahrir Square, the age of Western hegemony is fading away.