Don't know who yet............

Avatar for emty_nstr
Community Leader
Registered: 05-25-1999
Don't know who yet............
6
Sat, 08-27-2011 - 10:31am

HP says by the end of the year their consumer computers will be sold under another name........they are going to go to just selling to business

http://articles.boston.com/2011-08-19/business/29906209_1_hp-plans-smartphone-webos-software

Avatar for khatru1
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-07-2004
Mon, 08-29-2011 - 9:38am

It's the same thing IBM did a few years back. Lenovo bought their PC business.

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-18-2007
Fri, 09-09-2011 - 9:10am

There was an article about this yesterday in one of the tech e-newsletters I get.

 

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CL-ladybug987

Avatar for emty_nstr
Community Leader
Registered: 05-25-1999
Sat, 09-10-2011 - 1:18pm

No not getting out of the computer business, from what I understand are going to be more into business computers and their home computers probably will be under probably new division or something......

Avatar for emty_nstr
Community Leader
Registered: 05-25-1999
Sun, 09-11-2011 - 3:43pm

No I think just the consumer part of the business.

In a dramatic reshuffling, Hewlett-Packard said Thursday that it will discontinue its tablet computer and smartphone products and may sell or spin off its PC division, bowing out of the consumer businesses.

It's one of the most extreme makeovers in the company's 72-year history and signals new CEO Leo Apotheker's most transparent move to date to make HP look more like longtime rival IBM, which now makes most of its money from software and services.

The most apparent result for consumers will be the end of HP's TouchPad tablet, a sales dud, and HP-branded smartphones, also-rans in a booming market crowded with the iPhone and devices based on Google's Android system. By the end of next year, HP computers could be sold under another company's name.

HP will continue to sell servers and other equipment to business customers, just as IBM now does.

It was not immediately known whether any jobs will be cut. HP employs more than 300,000 worldwide.

A decade ago, HP emerged from a bitter fight to spend more than US$24 billion on Compaq Computer, setting the stage for HP to become the world's No 1 maker of personal computers. Now, three CEOs later, HP is changing course - hard.

The PC division is HP's biggest revenue generator but least profitable division. The move has long been rumoured, but just six months ago HP dismissed reports of the possibility as "irresponsible reporting" and that PCs are "core to HP's strategy for the connected world".

The PC industry is under pressure from hot-selling smartphones and tablet computers, which have contributed to already weak consumer demand for PCs in the US and Europe.

More striking is that HP plans to shutter its fledgling smartphone and tablet business just two years after spending US$1.8 billion on smartphone maker Palm, which gave HP the webOS software that has been praised by critics but largely been ignored by the marketplace. It is here that HP was the victim of the Apple and Google juggernauts, as iPads and iPhones and smartphones running Google's Android software have been hot sellers, while HP devices have languished.

HP also announced that it is in talks to buy Autonomy Corp., a business software maker. Earlier, The Wall Street Journal and Bloomberg News had reported that HP planned to buy Autonomy for US$10 billion, which would rank the deal among HP's biggest.

The decision to buy Autonomy also marks a change of course for HP, one that makes HP's trajectory look remarkably similar to rival IBM's nearly a decade ago. IBM, a key player in building the PC market in the 1980s, sold its PC business in 2004 to focus on software and services, which aren't as labor- or component-intensive as building computer hardware.

HP, which is based in Palo Alto, Calif., also announced its latest quarterly results an hour earlier than planned.

HP's net income increased in the fiscal third quarter, which ended July 31, but its lower-than-expected outlook for the current period weighed on the stock.

The company earned 93 cents per share in the latest quarter. That's up from 75 cents per share a year earlier. Its adjusted earnings were US$1.10 per share, a penny above analyst expectations.

Revenue climbed less than 2 percent to US$31.2 billion, matching analysts' average expectations, according to FactSet.

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-18-2007
Sun, 09-11-2011 - 4:00pm

I read a little while ago that they will still use their OS.

 

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CL-ladybug987

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-18-2007
Mon, 09-12-2011 - 1:22pm

I just read an article that says HP and Dell are losing business to places like Google and Facebook that have giant servers:

"When Facebook Inc. set out to build two new data centers, engineers couldn’t find the server computers they wanted from Dell Inc. or Hewlett-Packard Co. They decided to build their own."

You can read more about this here.


 

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CL-ladybug987