Do you hide your true personality at work?

Avatar for Cmmelissa
iVillage Member
Registered: 11-13-2008
Do you hide your true personality at work?
3
Fri, 09-27-2013 - 2:41pm

I thought this was a very interesting article from the Huffington Post, it's about research that was done on how being your true self can affect your overall work satisfaction:

The study maintains that while diversity programs will still need to focus on promoting participation of women and ethnic minorities at executive levels in organizations, now organizations have a new opportunity to harness a more nuanced kind of diversity. This form of diversity "acknowledges and appreciates the potential promise of each person's unique perspective and different way of thinking."

The idea behind diversity of thought is that we each have unique ways of thinking and solving problems, yet most organizations don't take this into account. Instead of matching people with teams and jobs that best suit their own way of processing information, "groupthink" is encouraged to maintain the status quo.

Deloitte's study suggests that organizations should instead foster a work environment "where all feel comfortable sharing their views and their authentic selves." They can do so by hiring differently by selecting a "cognitively diverse" organization, managing differently to encourage "task-focused conflict" rather than consensus, and promoting differently to foster a culture of inclusion and innovation.

Read more: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/09/26/personality-at-work_n_3976087.html?utm_hp_ref=mostpopular

I think it's important that you can be, for the most part, your true self at work.  It's hard to maintain a facade throughout your workday, and who you really are can bring a new perspective to the environment.

What do you think?

Avatar for lizmvr
Community Leader
Registered: 06-06-2001
Fri, 10-25-2013 - 11:32am

Wow, Julia, I think you might need to find a different position if you feel you're having to lie all the time at your current workplace. I disagree that 90% of salespeople don't believe in the products they're selling. I think it would be difficult for salespeople to be successful if that were the case; sure, you might not see much of a difference between two products, but if I was selling one, I'd have difficulty being genuinely convincing if I thought it was less than the other competitor product. I'd be trying to get a job at the competitor company :)

Lying is not acceptable in clinical research. So, though I've found my share of people that seem to fudge the truth, that's a reason for me and my organizations to not do further business with them. Patient safety is too important.

Liz


Clinical Research Associate


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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-24-2003
Mon, 10-21-2013 - 11:17am

What I think is that if people one day decided to really truly be themselves at work  the world as we know it would just stop. Ha! The whole concept of business, any kind, imho, survives because people pretend and lie. My product is SOOOOOOOO much better than his product, you MUUUUUUST buy mine. As if. Noone cares about what they sell...90% of people I know can barely tolerate their jobs.  We work to survive. Any job is at the end of the day just a way for us humans to keep being. We pretend and lie at least 8 hours of every day in order to be able to eat, have a roof above our heads and have the luxury to be ourselves at weekends and during holidays.  My (cynical) opinion. I've been in a job that is perfectly ok and doable and good but one that I don't give a **** about my entire life - can you tell??

Avatar for lizmvr
Community Leader
Registered: 06-06-2001
Sat, 09-28-2013 - 3:18pm

I think there are times when I hide my true personality in many situations, at work, at the grocery store, at the gym. I do think it can be difficult and draining to do it for hours on end during a workday, though. A previous employer, a small biotech startup, where I worked a few years ago, really challenged me to share my perspective and speak up when I thought my particular area was being disregarded--in the small company setting it was necessary for clinical, my department, research and development, and budgeting to all voice concerns in making decisions. I had to disagree with other directors, even though I was just an associate, because there wasn't another director of clinical that would voice the issues and effects in my area. I felt it was part of my job to truly be authentic, and I was very committed to the company and meeting company wide goals. I would love to be in such a situation again.

Right now, I am home based for a small clinical research organization. I do feel more heard in this position than the one I had with a different clinical research organization prior to switching companies. I don't necessarily feel that I have to be someone totally different, but I still feel like I'm in the "probationary" period of this new job; so, I don't want to make waves exactly either. I'm just quieter right now and feeling out my working relationships still. I will say that I've met two leaders and another coworker of my company in the last month in person, and it's nice that they make time to meet me when I'm traveling and believe in me enough to allow me train a new hire already. I definitely feel more appreciated with this organization than I did at the one before.

Liz


Clinical Research Associate


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http://www.