Is more expected from women in the workplace when they reach management levels?

Avatar for lizmvr
Community Leader
Registered: 06-06-2001
Is more expected from women in the workplace when they reach management levels?
4
Sat, 03-02-2013 - 10:53pm

CMEvelyn's post (http://www.ivillage.com/forums/ivillage-women/work/women-work/life-work/what-do-you-think-about-marissa-mayers-work-home-ban#new) got me wondering, do we hold women in management to a higher level of expectation than we do male managers? It seems based on the comments on the Huffington Post article about Marissa Mayer's ban on working from home that this CEO is not only expect to turn around Yahoo! but also to set a social standards for industry workplaces. I think Ms. Mayer already has a tough job in running Yahoo!, but I think others are taking it too far when they criticize her for not doing enough for other working women, especially working mothers. What do you think?

Liz


Clinical Research Associate


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Avatar for xxxs
Community Leader
Registered: 01-25-2010

  There will always be griping when things change.  And she does have some advantages being the boss.  But she is in a very competitive field.  Most of the work weeks are very long.  This is not 40 hours a week but 60-70+.  Many cannot understand what is going on in tech companies that have such strong work ethic.  Male workers have the same problems.  It is the cultural shift that is taking the hit.  We have out dated notions that the new technology will erase for some. 

chaika

Avatar for mahopac
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-24-1997

First of all, this isn't about women in management.  Marissa Mayer is a CEO, not a manager.  That means she is a leader of a company, not just a manager of people.

Second, this isn't about expecting "more" from a woman.  This is about an executive decision that is contrary to deeply held aspects of the culture of a technology company, which includes the concept of working remotely *thanks to* technology.  The issue is also that this particular executive happens to have built a nursery next door to her office, a luxury that other working parents don't get to have.  Demanding "face time" in an industry where people rarely spend time face to face, while taking advantage of the perks of her position, makes her seem like she has a tin ear.

I'm not saying that having 100% in-the-office workforce participation might not be the best thing for Yahoo at this point, but these are some of the reasons for the responses.  (BTW I don't work for Yahoo or have friends there, but I have been in the tech industry for 20 years.)

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-05-2013
It’s definitely the most-financially rewarding I've ever done. I Make money with Google. $85 an hour! I work two shifts, 2 hours in the day and 2 in the evening…And what’s awesome is I’m working from home so I get more time with my kids, I follow this great link,, Google.Fab17.com

(Go to site and open ‘Home’ for details)

Avatar for lizmvr
Community Leader
Registered: 06-06-2001
Thanks for joining the conversation. I agree with you to some extent, but the point I was making is that other commenters on the Huffington Post site are declaring Ms. Mayer a "bad manager" and an affront to women as she's a woman requiring men and other women to come into an office to work. I don't hear people complain about a male manager or CEO banning working from home as being an affront to other men or women. That's why I think it appears that more is expected from a woman in a management or company leadership position. It's just ironic to me that it seems that working women want other working women in positions of leadership but when that working woman in leadership makes a decision that seems to infringe on family life, working women take it so personally and declare the woman in leadership to be setting back all women despite being a top company and industry leader. Of course I'm not saying all women feel the same way, but based on the comments, lots of the vocal ones share that sentiment.

Liz


Clinical Research Associate


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http://www.