Owner's kids are ruining business

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-26-2013
Owner's kids are ruining business
2
Fri, 07-26-2013 - 10:47pm

I work for a great place, it's a new and different venue in our city, one-of-a-kind, potentially a huge money-making entertainment venue.  The people that work there right now are the best at what they do and all get along great, there are no conflicts between employees at all...except for one.

The owners have insisted on letting their children work for the company and essentially letting them have the best shifts all the time, regardless of who it screws over and no rules apply to anything they do. They show up whenever they want to, blantaly break rules that all other employees are reprimanded for and have turned into power-hungry spoiled brats. Up to this point it was tolerated by the majority of the staff but now it's hit a boiling point and almost all the staff have expressed they are fed up and looking for other job opportunities within the next week.  The children cannot be controlled, running to their parents whenever something happens they do not like and getting their way regardless of what has to happen.  

In the one year that we have been open, there have been 4 different manager - rumors have it that every previous manager has been fired because they stand up to the owners (who apparently want to have no managerial role in the operation of the venue) about the obvious special treatment of the children and their unruly behavior.  The owners don't understand that by letting their children run wild like monsters and disregard any and all rules, they are demolishing all relationships with employees.  Speaking to them about the problem would most likely end in termintation, perhaps not immediately but most likely soon after for one reason or another, because they refuse to believe there is an issue at all and anyone who speaks out about the problem is eventually no longer employed there.  The owners are really quite wonderful people but this has hit a point where they will soon be left with very few employees if this behavior continues.

What can you do about a situation such as this one? I would hate to stop working for the company because I love my job but I don't know how much longer I can continue to work with a spoiled brat who steam rolls anyone who gets in their way and their parents enable their bad behavior and don't see a problem with it. Any advice? 

Avatar for lizmvr
Community Leader
Registered: 06-06-2001
Sun, 07-28-2013 - 2:29pm

You really should start looking for another job, too. If you've noticed that people who go to the owners with solutions about issues arising between the kids and the other employees are subsequently fired, then I think it's fairly safe to assume that if you were to go to the owners, despite how wonderful they might be outside of the business environment, that you would suffer the same fate of termination.

The owners are the owners, and bad decisions or not, in your opinion, are still the owners' decisions. If the owners have shown you that regardless of how their decisions are adversely affecting the working environment for employees that aren't related to the owners, then you need to recognize that the employees who aren't related are really not that important to the owners. This situation might need to play out till the only employees left are the family members, and if the venue suffers, so be it. You don't have the power to change the owners, unfortunately. What you do have the power to do is find bosses that are more concerned about you and your job, valuing your input, ideas, and efforts.

Liz


Clinical Research Associate


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http://www.

Avatar for lizmvr
Community Leader
Registered: 06-06-2001
Tue, 09-10-2013 - 8:16pm

I was thinking about your post today and thought I'd try to find other points of view that might help. I found a lot that was directed toward business owners regarding hiring their children, but I didn't find much advice for non-familial employees in a family business. I did happen upon an article, still geared toward owners who hire both their children and non-family members, though that had some sage, if disheartening advice.

"Often the key employee has been told how valuable he or she is to the business and starts believing that means they are one of the family. While the owner might even think of this person that way, it isn’t the same as being related by blood. Sometimes a third party advisor must meet with the key employee and explain the reality of life; while they are important and greatly valued, they must understand that there will always be a difference in the way they are treated versus the way family members are treated. The question they must ask themselves is: are you being compensated and treated fairly? If the answer is yes, then the employee must get over feelings of resentment. If not, they must address the issue with the owner."

You can read the entirety of the article here: http://www.familybusinessinstitute.com/index.php/volume-3-articles/relating-to-non-related-key-employees.html

Maybe you should start your own consulting business to help people who are in the situation you've had instead of helping just the owners or at least write an article--your point of view seems to be missing from the discussion on a wider scale :)

Liz


Clinical Research Associate


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http://www.