To job or not to job

Avatar for super_grover_girl
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-08-2004
To job or not to job
14
Thu, 05-29-2014 - 7:28pm

Hey everyone!

I've been out of work for two months now and have been on the job interview merry-go-round since then. One company has had me come in for 5 different interviews with 5 different people over a 4 weeks period. After two weeks of silence they emailed me a job offer earlier today. I currently have no other job offers on the table but have recently applied for a job that fits my experience and skillset perfectly and is exactly the kind of job I've been waiting for so I am sincerely hoping to be called for an interview. This creates a bit of a pickle. Had the first company offered me the job two weeks ago I would have taken it right away. But knowing that this other job opportunity is out there is creating some doubts.There are several issues that I keep running in my head and it's making me a bit crazy. If anyone has any insight I would greatly appreciate it!

1) I know that I need to respond to this email job offer as I don't want them to think I'm no longer interested. What's an appropriate time frame to give them to mull over their offer and still hold out hope for a response from the other company? 

2) What's the appropriate amount of time to wait to see if the other company is interested?

3) I had applied to another job about a month ago at the same company that is offering this second job opportunity that I'm so excited about. They are actually a very specialized job placement service. I wasn't exactly perfect for that particular job but I was interested in learning more about it. After I applied they responded several hours later with a simple form email stating "we receive many resumes a month and aplogize that we are not able to respond to everyone..." followed by links to their website and social media pages. It's been three days I haven't received that form email and I had applied for the second job opportunity using a different email address accidentally (this is why you shouldn't link your emails with your apple accounts). Could this possibly be a sign I'm being considered? Or maybe they just deleted my resume?

I know that I'm probably reading into this too much and really need to let go and let the universe do what it does since a lot of this is out of my hands now. A decision needs to be made. But I REALLY want this second job opportunity but don't want to let go of this other offer if this second opportunity isn't possible. I am grasping at straws to give me any indication on what I should do. Any guidance, insight or stories you can share regarding similar experiences?

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Community Leader
Registered: 01-03-2004
Thu, 05-29-2014 - 8:04pm

This is a case of "a bird in hand is worth two in the bush." Remember that old saying? 

If you need a job and have nothing resembling an offer from your desired employer, you'd be wise to accept the first offer and say bye bye to the chance at the second one. If you are in a position to hold out for another job, then be courteous and let the first employer know within 1 to 2 business days that you are declining.

In my experience, you need to reply "yay" or "nay" to the live offer within one to two business days. If you don't, they may assume you're not interested, and move onto their second choice. By the way, the fact they considered you for another position tells me they were interested in you for the first job but you were either bested by another applicant, their first (or 2nd) choice turned them down, or, they decided you weren't a "fit" for the first job. Very often companies consider some applicants for another position they have open or coming open. It saves them time and money in recruiting for the other open position. 

Some things to consider: What do you know about the company that has extended the waiting job offer? Would the job as offered allow you to grow professionally and give you access to the kind of work, people, or networks you'd truly like to be a part of? Is there any opportunity to redefine the job or change the position to both utilize your skills and make the position more valuable to the employer? (Rarely is a job actually the one described in the job description. HR staff usually keep posting the "same old, same old" job description because they haven't time or energy to do their homework and write a 'true' job description. Jobs constantly change and they rarely look like their predecessor's position. Plus, HR may have to adhere to guidelines in writing job descriptions, may have outdated tasks or qualifications, or may be acting at the behest of someone higher up who wants a specific person to apply for the job. (Ironically, my current job - which turned out to be my "calling" in life - was 'not as described' in the ad. After I got hired, I learned the job description had been written to attract a specific candidate the CEO wanted to recruit. All the "skills" described in the job description had nothing to do with the actual job itself and was simply a recitation of the skill set of the desired candidate. By the way, she didn't bother to apply, she would have taken a 35% pay cut. I zeroed in on the one or two skills that I did have and could demonstrate. They never asked me a single question about the skills in the original ad. I landed the job by demonstrating what they really wanted this person to do.

If you are simply hoping the other job becomes an offer you may be left empty-handed. If you are in a position to turn down the first offer and wait, then you would be courteous to decline the first offer ASAP. If you do so, however, understand you will likely not be invited back for future interviews or postings. They will assume you don't want to work for the company. Another old saying comes to mind: once shy, twice burned.

Avatar for sabrtooth
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-03-1999
Thu, 05-29-2014 - 8:14pm

Be very clear--there is NO "opportunity" here.  There is an ad from a JOB PLACMENT SERVICE.  It's not even an ad from the real employer.  Take the job you have been offered, and be grateful you found something so quickly.

Avatar for super_grover_girl
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-08-2004
Thu, 05-29-2014 - 9:15pm
I think you may have confused what I was saying a little. It's not the easiest situation to explain without getting super specific and even then it confuses people. The job offer is for the only job I applied to for that company. The second is a job I applied for with a different company. The job offer comes from a very small independent private firm with maybe 10 employees. They have no definitive HR person and there is no real info out there about them that goes beyond what you would find in the yellow pages. The job itself is a new position and each interview I had there each person described the position differently so I'm not entirely sure what I'm getting into here. Even the title of the position offered is different from the title of the position they listed in the job ad. On the one hand it's good because I can sort of mold the job into more of what I would want it to be but on the other hand it's a job title below the other job titles listed on my resume which could possibly hurt me in the future. Also considering it took them another two weeks to get back to me after my last interview with them makes me think I'm their second choice. The second job is one I just applied to the other day that is exactly what I want to be doing but I haven't heard anything back yet. I had applied for a different job (through the same service that listed this job) that I kind of knew I wasn't right for. But I have the exact unique skills and experience that this position listed it's looking for. This job opportunity would be a step forward where as the job offer would be a step back. At this point it's hard to think I might be giving up the opportunity for something I really want to settle for what's being offered. It's a complex situation for me as I don't apply to big businesses. The jobs I apply to are independent and in the creative field. Rarely do I deal with a job where there is an HR person on staff. That's why I look for insight in other places since a lot of other job search discussion boards don't really have much to say about my odd situation. Also I think the other old say you are thinking of is: once bitten, twice shy
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-16-2008
Thu, 05-29-2014 - 10:27pm

The question is: how badly would that look in your line of business if you accept the job offer and then quit when you receive the better offier?  And if you burn bridges with the first company, would that be detrimental? 

Certain companies I worked for demanded absolute loyalty.  Others were more realistic about bottom lines - theirs, and yours, and had no hard feelings when I left for higher paying/geographically more suitable positions.

Only you can decide in your particular field what is acceptable.  Whatever you do, best of luck in your job search!

Avatar for super_grover_girl
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-08-2004
Thu, 05-29-2014 - 10:51pm

That's one of the questions in my head that's driving me crazy. If this second job opportunity had come along after I had accepted the first job offer there would be no question that I would stick with the job that I accepted. But knowing that there is a possibility of being considered for the second job (essentially my dream job) without having any obligation to the first job as it's still just an offer it changes everything. If I take the first job offer and then get called in to interview for my dream job only to tell then I already accepted another job then I end up resenting my new job. If I decline the job offer only to hear nothing from my dream job well then I'm back at sqaure one. I guess I need to figure out how I feel if I take the first job offer and hear nothing from my dream job.

Avatar for sabrtooth
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-03-1999
Thu, 05-29-2014 - 11:14pm

You are STILL not getting it.  You keep saying"...knowing that there is a possibility of being considered for the second job (essentially my dream job)...".  THERE IS NO JOB!!!  THERE IS FLYPAPER FROM A PLACEMENT FIRM!! 

Believe me, I worked with placement agencies for many years when I was an office manager.  Placement firms write up fake ads ALL THE TIME.  Their business depends upon having a variety of resumes in their files, that they can comb thru when they get a call from a client, so they can get bodies out to them IMMEDIATLY.  They cast a net, and keep the interesting resumes on file for when a REAL job comes, and then they call the ones they think might fill the bill.  They might even call a resume from a YEAR ago, if they think they could sell you to a client.  But eventually the resumes get too stale, and they fish again.

Avatar for super_grover_girl
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-08-2004
Thu, 05-29-2014 - 11:36pm

As I mentioned before Sabrtooth...this is a SPECIALIZED job placement firm for selective people in my industry. They are not like all of the others. Trust me I live in a big city and was unemployed for 8 months when the economy got really bad and had to go back to my administrative roots so I know them all. This company doesn't plaster their job ads all over Careerbuilder or Monster or SimplyHired or any of those fairly useless job boards just to get resumes. I know people in my industry that have been hired through them. I actually reached out to a couple of them asking if they could contact the company and put in a good word for me and maybe speed things along. I'm sorry that working in the job placement service industry has made you so jaded but I appreciate your input.

Community Leader
Registered: 01-03-2004
Fri, 05-30-2014 - 8:38am

The bottom line is you don't want job #1. So be courteous and let that employer know ASAP you aren't interested.

And, yes, for the record, I did understand you were talking about two different employers. i choose not to restate that fact.

Remember, when you post, those who choose to respond can only go by what you have stated in your post. You did not mention the fact Employer #1 was a small company of 10 people sans HR department. So please don't be offended if we can't read your mind.

I stand corrected on "old saying #2." Thank you.

 

Good luck on your job hunt.

 

Avatar for sabrtooth
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-03-1999
Fri, 05-30-2014 - 10:42am

From one "tooth" to another...  The op would have been better served by paying attention to "old saying" #1, than nitpicking #2. 

BTW, here's an excellent definition...

http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=a%20bird%20in%20the%20hand%20is%20worth%20two%20in%20the%20bush

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-16-2013
Fri, 05-30-2014 - 11:45am

I completely agree with the other poster about "A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush". You may never even be interviewed with the other place so if you need a job-accept the offer asap.

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