Being 'boss' at home may undermine women's ambition at work

Avatar for CMEvelyn
iVillage Member
Registered: 05-29-2012
Being 'boss' at home may undermine women's ambition at work
9
Wed, 01-30-2013 - 11:00pm

Working women who are in charge of running their household are less likely to pursue promotions and types of career advancement, a new study contends.

It appears that having control over household matters reduces women's interest in power outside of the home.

http://www.kndo.com/story/20625125/being-boss-at-home-may-undermine-womens-ambition-at-work-study

What do you think? Does running a household keep you from having high ambitions at work?

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-04-2013

I think it's more because women aren't given the opportunities at work that men are.

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-16-2008

More like those women are too exhausted from home and have little energy to fight for the more high-profile projects ...

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-21-2012

I think Demontespan has it spot on. I'm a single mom that works full time and I don't think I have a spare ounce of energy for anything more. I was given an oportunity to promote at my last job and I turned it down because of the extra time and resposibility it demanded. Call me unmotivated, but I knew my limits. 

Avatar for lizmvr
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-06-2001

I agree with Julie and Demontespan, too.

I remember reading another article about a woman who works in government commenting on other women in high profile government positions like Condoleeza Rice; the woman writing the article talked about how women in high positions are often childless, and she, the author, felt she wouldn't be able to pursue positions higher than what she had already attained professionally because her teenage son needed her at home more than the government really needed her. I think that many roles of nurturing families still fall to women, and I don't necessarily think that's bad actually--it does, however, keep us from being more ambitious professionally, which again, I don't think is necessarily bad.

Liz


Clinical Research Associate


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iVillage Member
Registered: 04-16-2008

And sometimes it comes down to priority and personal goals.  There are 16 people in my group, only 3 women (including myself) and none of us have kids.  During the 10+ year at this position, I have seen women leaving because the job is too crazy but the only men left are the ones eligible to retire.

Avatar for CMEvelyn
iVillage Member
Registered: 05-29-2012

demontespan wrote:
And sometimes it comes down to priority and personal goals.  

I've known men who are ambitious and work long hours and hardly spend any time with family who think they're doing it because their family is their first priority.

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-16-2008
demontespan wrote:
And sometimes it comes down to priority and personal goals.  

I've known men who are ambitious and work long hours and hardly spend any time with family who think they're doing it because their family is their first priority.

It STILL comes down to a matter of priority.  It takes financial resources, time, etc. to sustain a family.  Some people place a higher priority in contributing to the family's financial resources, some prefer to give the family more of their time. 

And very often these men have women who are the "boss" at home.  Nothing wrong with sticking to the traditional division of labor as long as the parties involved are OK with that.

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-28-1999
I'd love to know how they conducted this study to come to this conclusion because I think it's a ridiculous one. I was married & working w/ kids for 13 yrs. I can't say that I fel that I was "in charge" of the household, but I probably "ran" the household a lot more than my exH because i think that's what women end up doing--we work out side the home but we still take on the major part of responsibilites for making sure everything in the house runs well, the kids are cared for, etc. I'm sure that my ex didn't make one phone call to decide who our child care providers would be over the years--I was the one who was frantic about it because I was on maternity leave and had to go back to work--ironically I made about the same amoutn of money as my ex at that time too. I can't imagine any woman thinking "well, I got to decide where we went on vacatoin this year and what kind of furniture we bought for the living room so I don't need a promotion at work." I agree with the others who think that it's because we are too tired or that we realize it might be too difficult to work in a really hard job & take care of kids too. I thought it was interesting when I went to about my 15th law school reunion that even many of the women who had obtained the top law firm high paying jobs right out of school had quit those kind of jobs after they had kids to get jobs with more family friendly hours. It probably does have a lot to do with socialization but I don't think a lot of women who have kids never want to see them because they are working all the time. A lot of women who are CEOs also probably have DHs who have less important jobs and can do more with the kids.
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