Reading problems.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Reading problems.
8
Wed, 10-18-2006 - 3:17pm

My youngest son seems to be really struggling with reading. He's in the 1st grade and we just received his first report card and it has him at a level 2 which is early kindergarten level. His teacher says that this is causing him to struggle hard with 1st grade. He gets the letters and sounds confused when they are put into a word form yet you can show him individual letters and he can sound and read them with no problem. DH and I thought that he needed to be held back in K last year because of his reading but our school system will not hold a child back in K. UGH!! He started the after school tutoring program but I haven't noticed any change. Karen, Kristi, anyone else, can someone give me some advice, pointers, or guide me here? I'm an not good at teaching things so I seriously need some support from someone who has experience. HELP!!!

Your discouraged sister,
Robin

Robin

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-14-2004
In reply to: rmll
Thu, 10-19-2006 - 4:06pm
First, DON"T FREAK!!! Some kids take a bit to settle into the groove. You may need to supplement his reading with some light work at home. Hooked on Phonics and that stuff is one way to go. I would recommend finding something he loves to do. Find all you can to get him reading about it. If it's sports, get sports illistrated for kids. If he likes to, ahem...fish, send him to our website. Ok, shameless plug there, but you get the point. Karen will have tons of advice that I can't think of presently.

 

Kristi

You can't change the past, but you can ruin the present by worrying over the future.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2003
In reply to: rmll
Thu, 10-19-2006 - 10:53pm

Robin, take a breath~


He is only, what? 6? Thats not that bad. Sometimes boys seem to take a bit longer to get out of the starting gate..........but in time he will be passing all the other "studs" on the block! lol.


Hooked on phonics is good, I used that for my son. I also found this great curriculim Called Eagle Wings, Alphabet island. Here's the link


http://www.eagleswingsed.com/products/ai1.html


It's a all inclusive reading program with CD's to reinforce the workbooks. If your son likes music at all, the tunes will help him. It has been proven that children, as well as adults, learn very well through music. The cost for the set is a little high, but in my mind, worth it. It's like 69.00 dollars.

"I know my plans for you"declares the Lord. "Plans to prosper you,  and not to harm you. Plans to give you hope and a future" Jeremiah 29:11

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
In reply to: rmll
Fri, 10-20-2006 - 9:46am

You are shameless! Okay, send me your site info and we'll check it out this weekend because Jesse is all into outdoorsy hunting fishing and animals. Thanks for the advice. I'm seriously concerned he'll slip thru the cracks. He's already the smallest guy in the class and catches flack from some of the other boys. I just want to keep the little guy from having any other reasons for the boys to pick at him. He hasa wonderfully sweet personality and is incredibly trender.

Robin

Robin

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
In reply to: rmll
Fri, 10-20-2006 - 9:57am

I have 2 brothers who were diagnosed with dyslexia. Believe me when I say me and DH have thought alot of about it. I'm trying to locate the books we have in storage that I used with Josh when he was first learning to read. I think my panic comes from the fact that Josh has always been a really accelerated reader. He's reading on the 4th grade level in 2nd grade. I've had a time with him needling Jesse. I just want to string him up by his toes sometimes. Joshua can hear something once and it clicks and stays. Jesse doesn't have that working for him at this point. Jesse, from birth, has been more layed back and more interested in taking things slowly. I have to tell you though, he's doing really good with his spelling. He's only missed 3 words on spelling tests since school started so I'm hopefull that if the spelling is sticking that the reading will click too. My boys are the opposite ends of the spectrum when it comes to learning. Josh is all books and computers and Jesse is completely a hands on, visual child. Maybe I'm the one with the issue here. With Josh being so independent, I expect that from Jes too. Hmmm.... I checked out the website you posted. It looks promising but at this point I don't have a computer at home to work with. I'll keep it so when we do get set up, I can check it out again. Thanks!

Robin

Robin

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2003
In reply to: rmll
Fri, 10-20-2006 - 11:15pm

Ok, I understand that reaction PERFECTLY!


I have one child who learns everything right away, it all just clicks! Then the next one down is the total opposite! Everything comes to her with much work and constant repitition. Having them so close to each other was a real problem for many years. My younger child always felt and still sometimes feels so "stupid" as she says. She says she hates who she is because its so hard for her. I had a hard time because I wanted to fix her somehow, but truth be, she is who she is! She may not be skilled in scholar, but she is kind, resourceful and gifted in other ways. God works in mysterious ways. I hope you feel God's grace in this situation. I'm sure Jesse will be just fine. God will excell him where he desires him to be. I'm sure his giftings will become more prominate as he grows and matures. ((((hugs)))) my dear friend! You will be fine! And So will he! ;)



"I know my plans for you"declares the Lord. "Plans to prosper you,

"I know my plans for you"declares the Lord. "Plans to prosper you,  and not to harm you. Plans to give you hope and a future" Jeremiah 29:11

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-06-2004
In reply to: rmll
Sun, 10-22-2006 - 11:32pm

I've taught grade one for going on 12 years and I find the kids who struggle with learning to read fall into 2 categories:

1. They have a later birthday (late October-December) and therefore are almost an entire year behind their peers in development. We wouldn't expect a child who is nearly younger than a toddler to up and learn to walk immediately even with daily practice so why do we push those who are physically, emotionally, and socially younger to learn to read?

2. They don't have a strong PHONEMIC awareness. This is NOT phonics. You said he can identify letters in isolation which is one step but phonemic awareness is about knowing that words are made of parts (sounds or phonemes) and doing a program like Hooked on Phonics does not address this. In my grade one classroom we are ALWAYS playing with sounds with songs and chants. Do you remember the Name Game Song? Do you know Willoby Wallaby Woo? Good ole Dr. Seuss is great too because he is always rhyming and playing with phonemes. Rather than drilling letter sounds which he already knows, it sounds to me like he really needs to develop phonemic awareness. Please ask his teacher about this.

My best advice however is not to stress about it. I know, easier said than done but kids really do sense how their parents are feeling and your stress on top of what he already feels bad about is not going to help. Just let him know you're there to help and that he WILL learn to read. It's not a race.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
In reply to: rmll
Mon, 10-23-2006 - 9:43am

Thank you for your response. Jesse happens to be the youngest child in his class. His 6th birthday was October 13th. I understand what you are saying about age. That was one of several reasons we gave last year as reasons to hold him in Kindergarten another year but were told our school wouldn't hold him back. I try not to stress about this. I believe the little guy is smart but the reading connection just hasn't happened yet. I'll talk to his teacher about phonemic awareness. Thanks again!

Robin

Robin

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-15-2001
In reply to: rmll
Mon, 10-23-2006 - 11:17am

Dear Robin,
I have been studying Reading Education at the doctoral level for over 2 years now, and what I have learned above all else is that these problems are extremely common and best remedied at the earliest possible levels. It sounds like your son needs direct, systematic instruction in phonics. It is very common for early readers to have no problem with letters in isolation but struggle with letter combos and words. Part of this is developmental (it will come with time), but some is the result of how reading is commonly taught in schools. Too often, the teacher presents letter or words and asks the class, "what does this say?" Then, naturally, the students who already know answer the question, and a large number of kids don't really know but they just nod and go with the flow. The kids who don't quite get it need the teacher to explicitly teach the phonic combinations. I know a fantastic phonics system called "Word Building" that I have found to make a BIG difference. Good luck! Don't be discouraged, and also, don't depend on an after school tutoring program. They are a great option as a supplement, but a struggling reader needs lots of daily practice and individual help.

Hugs.
Erica

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