Lolita Fashion

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Registered: 02-15-2007
Lolita Fashion
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Mon, 04-16-2012 - 9:53am

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-23-2011
Mon, 04-16-2012 - 12:30pm

Fashion, both vintage and modern, is my other favorite hobby besides anthropology. I think Lolita fashion is a facinating culture, even though it does not fit my personal style. I do have an affinity for legit vintage victorian clothing but I think that the fact that many of their clothes are Victorian inspired is secondary to primary focus of the movement.

From what I understand the term 'Lolita' isn't meant to be sexual at all, which is what I think most people assume. Rather ther term came about because the Japanese girls who first started with the sub culture thought it meant something cute in Portuegese. (As Japan used to have close relations with Portugal). The idea is to be pretty, but also completely covered up. If was started as a way to distance from the common trend of women wearing very little clothing to look sexy. Looking sexy isn't the point for a Lolita, though I think they often get accused of dressing the way they do to attract a perception that men want women to look like little girls in a pedophelic sort of way. Which is totally incorrect.

Like Harajuku I think that the Lolita subculture is something that arose because of a mass amount of people living and existing in a very small expanse of land. In this case, Japan. I know there are alot of more westernized people that look at the Lolitas, the Harajuku girls, the cyber punks ect that exist in Tokyo and thinkt they're freaks. I actually commend them for doing it. They have alot more guts to be who they are and not appologise for it that the rest of us do. I think we could actually learn from them in that sense. I personally find it beautiful, it's like art and art is personal and shouldn't be shunned.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 11-18-2011
Mon, 04-16-2012 - 1:05pm
Check out a ComicCon.....tons of Sailor Moon and Lolita costume running around...i think you pretty much can have and see anything for a price
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Registered: 02-15-2007
Tue, 04-17-2012 - 8:44am

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Registered: 02-15-2007
Tue, 04-17-2012 - 8:45am

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-23-2011
Tue, 04-17-2012 - 12:57pm

One of my heroes is British fashion designer Alexander McQueen. It was his belief that fashion was the highest form of art and of personal expression. Many of his designs have been considered outlandish, impractical or just plain bizarre.

McQueen was an artist as well as a tailor and dressmaker. He never appologised for anything he designed and everything he created was a huge labor of love. The vast majority of his dresses he handmade himself, and some of them were only beautiful to him or those who understood what he was trying to do. Many of his designs had aesthetics that most people would not wear even to a special event, much less everyday. Some were sheer, some completely exposed breasts and on occasion other body parts, but the point for him was to create something beautiful, even if it wasn't functional or with the confines of what most people think of as 'beauty'.

That is why he is one of my heroes. His perception of beauty is something I think others could benefit from experiencing. I love the idea of fashion as art, it is art. I also like the idea of fashion for beautys sake, because really that is the core of the industry. Women tend to like fashion because they love pretty clothes and the way they look in pretty clothes. I just think that beauty is subjective, like with the Lolitas, some find t beautiful and others find it kind of creepy. Alot like MCQueen and his designs. :)

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Registered: 02-15-2007
Wed, 04-18-2012 - 10:43am

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-23-2011
Wed, 04-18-2012 - 3:37pm

Betsey is my other fashion hero. I got to visit her fashion house when I was in high school. I went to NYC to visit the Fashion Institute of Technology and got to take a tour of her offices as well as those at Dior with one of the school represenatives. Long story short, tuition at the Fashion Institute is sky high, so instead of taking out huge loans I went to a state school and studied Anthropology instead.

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Registered: 02-15-2007
Thu, 04-19-2012 - 11:02am

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Registered: 02-15-2007
Thu, 04-19-2012 - 2:30pm

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-23-2011
Thu, 04-19-2012 - 2:47pm

I also find Steampunk fashion facinating. Some of it on occasion will even creep into my own wardrobe, as I do fancy Victorian style clothing. Though there are just as many Steampunk folks who follow Eduardian styles or American Western as there are Victorian.

I think Steampunk is avtually much more varied than Lolita and alot of the Japanese subcultures though. Everyone seems to have their own way of doing it, and alot of it isn't based on history at all, but Sci-Fi like the book Anubis Gates, which helped start the movement and movies and video games. I notice alot of women get into steampunk to look sexy. Not that there is anything wrong with that, but I get overwhelmed when I see a woman in a tight corset and five million gears and watchworks attached to her.

Having said that, I do find alot of the more traditional Steampunk looks, that are based on actual fashion trends of the time periods to be amazing to look at. I like the idea of mixing something so 'old fashioned' like an Eduardian waistcoat and adding a few baubles or corset lacing to make it look unique. I sew and I have done that many times to garments, a waistcoat included.

I think Steampunk fashion was a result of a movement instead of fashion that caused a movement, like the Lolitas. Does that make sense? There are no set limits of what one can wear as a Steampunk, unlike the Lolits whom have very specific likes and dislikes.

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