Research on Online dating

Avatar for mhash
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Registered: 03-27-2003
Research on Online dating
4
Sun, 11-13-2011 - 11:19pm

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/13/fashion/online-dating-as-scientific-research.html

Snippets from the article

Of the romantic partnerships formed in the United States between 2007 and 2009, 21 percent of heterosexual couples and 61 percent of same-sex couples met online,

...about 81 percent of people misrepresent their height, weight or age in their profiles,

On average, the women described themselves as 8.5 pounds thinner in their profiles than they really were. Men fibbed by 2 pounds, though they lied by a greater magnitude than women about their height, rounding up a half inch (apparently every bit counts).

in a different study she found that women’s profile photographs were on average a year and a half old. Men’s were on average six months old.

Scholars say a certain amount of fibbing is socially acceptable — even necessary — to compete in the online dating culture. Professor Ellison’s research shows that lying is partly a result of tension between the desire to be truthful and the desire to put one’s best face forward. So profiles often describe an idealized self; one with qualities they intend to develop (i.e., “I scuba dive”) or things they once had (i.e., a job). Some daters bend the truth to fit into a wider range of search parameters; others unintentionally misrepresent their personalities because self-knowledge is imperfect.

The standard of embellishment can frustrate the honest. “So if I say I am 44, people think that I am 48,” said one man interviewed by Professor Ellison and colleagues in a separate study.

...shows that more than 80 percent of the contacts initiated by white members were to other white members, and only 3 percent to black members. Black members were less rigid: they were 10 times more likely to contact whites than whites were to contact blacks.

Avatar for floridagirl52
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Registered: 10-16-2006
Mon, 11-14-2011 - 8:06am

Thanks for posting Mark. I found this passage interesting, I've read it before in other articles:

Scholars say a certain amount of fibbing is socially acceptable — even necessary — to compete in the online dating culture. Professor Ellison’s research shows that lying is partly a result of tension between the desire to be truthful and the desire to put one’s best face forward. So profiles often describe an idealized self; one with qualities they intend to develop (i.e., “I scuba dive”) or things they once had (i.e., a job). Some daters bend the truth to fit into a wider range of search parameters; others unintentionally misrepresent their personalities because self-knowledge is imperfect.

I will say right here that I have never lied in my profile about anything. I find it's especially sad to read profiles of men who say they do all of these things, but in fact, they did them 10 years ago. (I know women do this too). This is why I don't say that I was a professional singer in my profile because I don't sing professionally anymore. I think it would be interesting to someone, but it's old news now--plus I can tell them about it when we meet.

Avatar for mhash
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Mon, 11-14-2011 - 12:08pm

I think it IS a lot harder for women as you get older (been discussed here a lot) whether online or in person.

By the way, a lot of profiles state that they look younger than they are which makes that assertiong meaningless for me.

However if you feel the same, then go for stating your age as such.

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-28-1999
Mon, 11-14-2011 - 2:43pm

I don't lie about my age because I figure that if age is a huge deal to a man then when he finds out my true age he won't want to date me anyway--I've seen some guys who list their age as a certain thing, but will say in the profile that they are actually older.

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-08-2011
Tue, 11-15-2011 - 10:03am

Actually, if during the time I tried the online world, a woman had wrote