Word of the Day - Week of 5/13/02

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Word of the Day - Week of 5/13/02
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Sun, 05-13-2007 - 9:17pm
Word of the Day for Sunday, May 13, 2007

doughty \DOW-tee\, adjective:


Marked by fearless resolution; valiant; brave.


He was obsessed with the Arctic, his imagination stoked by epic accounts of the doughty pioneers who had led wooden ships into uncharted waters and northern mists.
-- Sara Wheeler, "In Cold Blood?", New York Times, February 25, 2001

One day he stumbled, fell against the spinning saw and half severed his left arm. It was three days before a doctor came, but the doughty old Swede was still alive.
-- Quentin Reynolds, "The Bold Victory of a Man Alone", New York Times, September 13, 1953

Doughty comes from Old English dohtig, "brave, valiant, fit."


Nadine - deenie1979

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Registered: 03-26-2003
Mon, 05-14-2007 - 6:27pm
Thanks for sharing these!! I had to unsubscribe from getting them at work since this is my last week!! Gae
Gae
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Registered: 05-15-2003
Tue, 05-15-2007 - 8:46pm
Last week already??

Nadine - deenie1979

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Tue, 05-15-2007 - 8:47pm
Word of the Day for Tuesday, May 15, 2007

vitiate \VISH-ee-ayt\, transitive verb:


1. To make faulty or imperfect; to render defective; to impair; as, "exaggeration vitiates a style of writing."
2. To corrupt morally; to debase.
3. To render ineffective; as, "fraud vitiates a contract."


MacNelly is one of the few contemporary political cartoonists who can use humor to accentuate, not vitiate, his points.
-- Richard E. Marschall, "The Century In Political Cartoons", Columbia Journalism Review

, May/June 1999

Their religious convictions and conduct were held to be vitiated by hideous error.
-- David Vital, A People Apart

Whatever a "real contradiction" might be, "apparent contradictions" are quite sufficient to vitiate a doctrine of biblical authority that is based on the supposedly apparent reading of the text.
-- Robert M. Price, "The Psychology of Biblicism", Humanist, May 2001

It seems churlish to say of a book that is beautifully written, richly allusive, learned, elegant, Proustian in tone and mode, that precisely these qualities vitiate its ostensible purpose, distracting attention from the subject and focusing it upon the very gifted author.
-- Gertrude Himmelfarb, "A Man's Own Household His Enemies", Commentary, July 1999

It is conceivable that an error could be so serious as to vitiate the entire body of the work.
-- Linda Hawes Clever and Lois Ann Colaianni, "Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts Submitted to Biomedical Journals", Public Health Reports, May/June 1997

Vitiate comes from Latin vitiare, from vitium, fault. It is related to vice (a moral failing or fault), which comes from vitium via French.


Nadine - deenie1979

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Avatar for catgrl2
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Registered: 03-26-2003
Wed, 05-16-2007 - 4:04pm
Woo hoo is right, last week, last 3 days (including today!!). Thanks for sharing these!! Gae
Gae
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Registered: 05-15-2003
Wed, 05-16-2007 - 8:32pm
Word of the Day for Wednesday, May 16, 2007

penchant \PEN-chunt\, noun:


Inclination; decided taste; a strong liking.


Ben was a dreamy little boy, recalls Hiddy, who always thought her brother's penchant for reveries might lead him to become an artist or a great philosopher.
-- Thomas Maier, Dr. Spock: An American Life

Field, in his personal comportment, maintained a penchant for austerity, a contempt for frivolity, and a "steely cold" disdain for any decision not based on fundamental business principles.


-- RolandMarchand, Creating the Corporate Soul

Even as an adolescent bookkeeper in a trading house in Cleveland, Rockefeller minutely recorded his charitable donations in ledgers, which confirm that from an early age he had a penchant for giving money no less than for making it.
-- Ron Chernow, "Mystery of the Generous Monopolist", New York Times, November 18, 1998

Penchant comes from the present participle of French pencher, "to incline, to bend," from (assumed) Late Latin pendicare, "to lean," from Latin pendere, "to weigh."


Dictionary.com Entry and Pronunciation for penchant


Nadine - deenie1979

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Registered: 05-15-2003
Thu, 05-17-2007 - 8:00pm
Word of the Day for Thursday, May 17, 2007

flagitious \fluh-JISH-uhs\, adjective:


1. Disgracefully or shamefully criminal; grossly wicked; scandalous; -- said of acts, crimes, etc.
2. Guilty of enormous crimes; corrupt; profligate; -- said of persons.
3. Characterized by enormous crimes or scandalous vices; as, "flagitious times."


However flagitious may be the crime of conspiring to subvert by force the government of our country, such conspiracy is not treason.
-- Ex parte Bollman & Swartwout

, 4 Cranch 126 (1807)

The Grinch, a nefarious, flagitious, sly, nasty, troublesome, bad-tempered, intolerant and foul-smelling character who, for reasons never fully explained, lives in a cave above the town.
-- Robin Greer, "Carrey Christmas", News Letter, December 1, 2000

These men were reported to be heretics . . . , seducers of youth, and men of flagitious life.
-- Isaac Taylor, History of the World

During the Whiskey Rebellion 200 years ago, a preacher declared: "The present day is unfolding a design the most extensive, flagitious and diabolical, that human art and malice have ever invented . . . If accomplished, the earth can be nothing better than a sink of impurities."
-- George Will, "Paranoiac Terrorism Is Part of American History", Newsday, April 25, 1995

Break heart, drop blood, and mingle it with tears, Tears falling from repentant heaviness Of thy most vile and loathsome filthiness, The stench whereof corrupts the inward soul With such flagitious crimes of heinous sins As no commiseration may expel, But mercy, Faustus, of thy Saviour sweet, Whose blood alone must wash away thy guilt.
-- Christopher Marlowe, The Tragical History Of Doctor Faustus

Flagitious comes from Latin flagitiosus, from flagitium, "a shameful or disgraceful act," originally, "a burning desire, heat of passion," from flagitare, "to demand earnestly or hotly," connected with flagrare, "to blaze, to burn."


Nadine - deenie1979

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