Shortchanging America’s Women

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-18-2000
Shortchanging America’s Women
4
Mon, 09-20-2010 - 11:43am

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/20/opinion/20mon3.html?_r=1&hp





Annual earnings data released last Thursday by the Census Bureau confirm a troubling discrepancy facing women workers and their families. Full-time women employees still make, on average, only 77 cents for every dollar earned by men — a lingering gender gap that depresses women’s pay by thousands of dollars.



This latest confirmation of disparate compensation poses an immediate challenge for the Senate, where important legislation aimed at combating gender-based wage discrimination now hangs in the balance.



The measure, the Paycheck Fairness Act, would accomplish a much-needed updating and strengthening of the nation’s 47-year-old Equal Pay Act.



Key provisions would enhance the remedies available for victims of gender-based discrimination, protect employees from retaliation for sharing salary information with co-workers, and require employers to show that wage differences are job-related, not sex-based, and driven by business necessity.



The clock is ticking. The bill, which has strong backing from the Obama White House, has already passed the House by a wide margin. With scant time remaining in the Congressional session, the Senate must act quickly to pass the bill or it will die.



The fact that the Senate bill has no Republican co-sponsors speaks volumes about the prevailing partisan atmosphere on Capitol Hill.



But four G.O.P. senators — Susan Collins and Olympia Snowe of Maine, Kay Bailey Hutchison of Texas, and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska — supported another measure targeting wage discrimination just last year. By standing up again for America’s women when the Paycheck Fairness Act finally reaches the Senate floor, they would advance the cause significantly.



 


Photobucket&nbs

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-19-2010
Tue, 09-21-2010 - 10:15am

(The fact that the Senate bill has no Republican co-sponsors speaks volumes about the prevailing partisan atmosphere on Capitol Hill.)

Gosh....silly me. I thought Democrats had ALL the power to pass whatever they wanted. Surely the democrats who could EASILY pass this...but for some reason won't, cannot blame this on the republicans, right?

What's the delay? Why don't they pass it without Republican support?

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-30-2002
Tue, 09-21-2010 - 11:17am
I agree. Why continue to point out the obvious Republican bias against women in this and other matters. Just get it done.




iVillage Member
Registered: 03-18-2000
Tue, 09-21-2010 - 11:29am
It will take 60 votes to end the debate & then vote. Collins & Snow oppose the bill making it unlikely the Dem's in the Sen. will get a Rep. vote to end the debate.

 


Photobucket&nbs

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-19-2010
Tue, 09-21-2010 - 5:19pm

I haven't read the bill, but it must be loaded down with other garbage that makes it unappealing....even to the women in the senate.

Perhaps our politicians should just quit tacking on amendments and loading bills down with crap that nobody wants. THEN they might be able to get something done.

Again, Democrats have ALL the power. It is such a shame they squandered their short time with blaming the republicans for everything. America can plainly see them for the failures that they are.

Now....they made everyone so angry that most likely they will lose their power in November with getting virtually nothing accomplished.

Oh yeah....except that EXTREMELY unpopular HC bill that nobody wants (except the insurance companies).

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-25-2010
Mon, 10-25-2010 - 10:49am

Here's an even better solution... put women in the position to make the laws themselves... looks like it may help

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-10-2011
Tue, 01-11-2011 - 11:54am

"The fact that the Senate bill has no Republican co-sponsors speaks volumes about the prevailing partisan atmosphere on Capitol Hill. "

Yes, it does.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-11-2011
Fri, 02-04-2011 - 2:12pm

I would like to quote a passage from "The Feminine Mystique" by Betty Friedan.

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Sun, 02-06-2011 - 1:33pm

What a great quote! I am consistenly impressed with Betty Friedan.

Personally, I acknowledge that I am quite sexist. I think there are differences between men and women. I think those differences are more inherent than learned. I don't believe that either sex is better than the other.

I do not think the male as provider role should influence paying women less money, but I believe that is does. I know there are a lot of people out there who believe that the differences in pay are due to circumstances, staying home with young children, opting for a "mommy track", but I don't think so. I think there is a measurable unfairness about the way that men and women are compensated for the work that they do. I think it is purely sexist - and not in a good way.