Glee!

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-06-2010
Glee!
3
Wed, 10-06-2010 - 10:06am

I hate to say it, but I kind of agreed with Sue on last night's religion episode. Religion should not be in schools and I felt bad that all the kids were pressuring Kurt to pray. Although I thought Grilled Cheesus was pretty funny. What did you guys think?

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-15-2009
Wed, 10-06-2010 - 12:27pm

I thought it was an excellent show,

okiesilly
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-07-2010
Thu, 10-07-2010 - 1:51am
That is an interesting response. I have a couple of questions if that's okay. Haha, actually just one, sorry. What do you mean by "hoping it would all work out?" I am going to assume that you meant that Curt's father would wake up from the coma and be revitalized to his initial state. Please correct me if I am wrong...

Here's what I am getting at though, what if he would have passed away? This is one tangible avenue of thought that we must pursue. It would seem, on Glee at least, that a majority opinion is that when someone close dies in their life that they are angry with God for taking them away, or something to that effect. (I must establish 2 things: I am a follower of Jesus Christ and I have never lost anyone I know personally. I establish these things so as to prevent coming across as haughty, distant, and arrogant. I know not the pain of death of a close relative or friend.) My query is: if that is a worldview (view of God, religion, death) can it work or can it hold up? To assume that God holds the keys to life and death and then on a whim, out of no reason or sincere emotion, God takes life away...and that's it. He has not consideration for the person that passed away, their family, or to what affect the death of this person would have. OR in a case such as this episode of Glee God, for one reason or another, decides to be good and actually spares the life of the person in question but again for seemingly no other reason...or because someone believed in something (who knows what) but they believed in it just enough to sway the mind of this "God." My point: this is an impractical and exhausting system. And when it is fleshed out the only one to blame for death is God. We didn't even begin to consider the way that Curt's father treated his body (CAREFUL: I am not saying that people who eat poorly deserve to die). However, we must take into account the situations regarding the position that the person finds themselves, why, and how they got there. Curt's father wasn't healthy. He didn't eat healthily. That is why he had a heart-attack. Not because God is evil. Or God hated him. Or God doesn't exist. So one cannot come to the conclusion here that God simply doesn't exist because of premature or sudden death.

So where do we go from there? I would assume that many believe that you can "believe what you wish" and as long as you believe hard enough or "true" enough that "god, gods, God" will assuage you of your condition and supernaturally rescue you. Glee however set up no frame to explicitly define what religion actually was. They debased it and lowered it to a definition of two things: 1) God will give you what you want whenever you want it (Finn) OR 2) That God cannot be defined because no one is wrong and every religion ends up taking you to the same place. So we might as well bring in all hosts of religions and world views so as to pray enough that the person in question will be saved OR maybe just maybe one belief system is right and if they happen to be praying God will hear and then will come to the rescue. Again...an exhaustive and destructive system. If we say, "All religions believe the same thing", then what do we do with the Christian commandment of "Have no other gods before me"? What do we do with Judaism which subscribes to the line of thought that only Jewish people are the people of God? What do we do about Hinduism which believes that growing closer to gods or to the afterlife is actually emptying your mind of reason and thought? Islam, who again only believe that their chosen people are only elect? Buddhism which propagates a view that god cannot be defined?

Do they really say the same thing? Do you really all go to the same place? I won't even begin on Finn's religious worldview. That was absolutely ridiculous and absurd, the slot-machine god theory works for about an hour.

So my main point is what is the point of God? It's a good question. One that if you seek the answers to you might see the world a little differently. Consider the worldview's of each religion. I guarantee you they crumble before the man that is Jesus Christ. I'd love to carry on this dialogue. That is if anyone actually read this. Sorry for the long post. But if someone actually does please respond, even if you disagree with everything I say. I'd love to hear what you think.

Chris Morris
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-07-2010
Thu, 10-07-2010 - 4:47pm

Hi Chris,

In my view, you've missed the point a bit. The show wasn't about religion so much as it was about respect and tolerance. Nobody changed their religions, and Curt never changed his mind about being an atheist. But what he -- and Sue -- learned was to have more respect and give a little room for people with other belief systems. So this episode was neither challenging nor promoting religion; it was promoting tolerance. And I believe it did so in am impressively frank way. They asked the question head on "is there a God", but then since that is a question of faith and thus unanswerable, moved to a much more relevant question in this context: "Can people of different faiths support each other without challenging each other?" Whether Curt's dad lived or died (and the bible of TV commands that he lives), the answer would still have been YES. Curt shows that himself when he went to church and allowed others to pray without giving an inch of his own perosnal integrity.