Question Of The Week: Mustard

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-20-2003
Question Of The Week: Mustard
9
Mon, 09-15-2003 - 7:47am
What type/style, or name brand of mustard is your favorite? Do you end up purchasing more than one type/style due to others tastes or for cooking in your house?

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I preffer the type with horseradish in it, but yes....I do end up purchasing just plain yellow mustard due to the tastes of my children, wife, and for cooking. Occasionally, I'll spoil everyone by purchasing a small container of honey-mustard for use here too.

Mitch

 
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Mon, 09-15-2003 - 3:09pm
Yellow mustard is what we use most. Whatever is the cheapest, that kind all tastes the same to me. I love dijon on sandwiches and dogs. Honey mustard is yummy but don't buy it often. Of course I have powdered mustard in the pantry for cooking!

Gee, now you have me hungry for a big ole hot dog LOL ~Cheryl~

Avatar for ohfarmmom
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Wed, 09-17-2003 - 10:05am
Bleh...mustard....along with mayonaisse, it's one of the few things I won't eat. However, I usually keep a small bottle of spicy brown mustard to use a small bit in baked beans. Otherwise, forget it.

~ Joy

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-20-2003
Thu, 09-18-2003 - 8:48am
Welcome Joy! I'm so glad to see you stopping by this board. How are you doing at storing up your harvests so far?

Mitch

 
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Fri, 09-19-2003 - 9:39am
I like really good dijon mustard & my favorite brand is Maille. I also like Gold's Honey Mustard. I don't like the yellow kind at all.

Elaine


Elaine

Avatar for ohfarmmom
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Fri, 09-19-2003 - 4:19pm
Hi Mitch!

I haven't been around much the past few weeks because I've been busy with some projects here, mainly working on some grant proposals with business plans and all the financial junk to go along with it.

I'm not sure exactly what you're referring to when you ask, "How are you doing at storing up your harvests so far?"

If you are referring to the produce in my little garden.....there's not enough there to do any canning or preserving, so we're just enjoying it as it's picked. My tomatoes didn't do too well - I've only had maybe 6 or 8 tomatoes so far, but there are quite a few green ones out there. My pepper plants suffered from blight this year. All I have gotten off of what started out as 6 plants (and looks like that's about all there will be) are 3 hungarian wax peppers and 2 jalapenos. My bell pepper plants didn't produce a single pepper! (Wahhh!!) We also had a mess of broccoli and a just a few cucumbers. That's it. Pathetic.

Or, if you are referring to farm harvests....we are almost done cutting and housing Burley Tobacco, we have a couple days work yet to finish filling the silo, and we haven't started harvesting any corn or soybeans yet. The beans were so late getting planted due to the wet weather, that they are still very green. I guess they'll get combined a few days after the first killing frost.

So that's what's going on here....

: ) Joy

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-20-2003
Sun, 09-21-2003 - 8:48am
Feeling blue with you on all that rainy weather your way. I'm even surprised that the tobacco did well with all that wet weather that hit the mid sections of the US this year.

You can make relish from green tomato's, using a standard sweet pickle relish recipe, but replacing the amount of pickles with green tomatoes, through a grinder, (minus the stem end that is) LOL...had to get in a zinger right???... Then it's exactly the same mix amounts of seasonings and white vinegar. Once set up canned or frozen for about 6 weeks....no one will realy notice much difference between the two. You can also make "corn" relish, using fresh corn...I know...a bit late with that one...along with some gound up tomato's or pickles during corn season for a wonderful colorful taste treat. All relishes are made (as my mother sais) by simply replacing one primary vegetable with another in amounts.

Mitch Raised a farmer by very frugal parents...LOL...

 
Community Leader
Registered: 02-27-1999
Mon, 09-22-2003 - 1:13am
Try Colman's dry, make your own, whatever you like! I love this stuff, gotta have it. Here's a link:

http://www.ilhawaii.net/~danrubio/mustard/recipes.html

Enjoy, baby! I did a whole series and chat on mustard a...few years back? LOL! Oh, well, the mustard did not help my memory, but it sure is GREAT on salmon steaks, and making up a little batch fresh for grilled brats will make your eyes water and your hair sweat! I love Colman's, runny mascara, and sweaty hair! YUUUUUMMMMMM!!!

k-roni

Photobucket
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-20-2003
Mon, 09-22-2003 - 8:28am
I just knew there was a reason I liked you so roni! thanks for the memories of home made mustard packs for winter cold and flu season time.....and the sweating hair and all over that...ROFLOL

Mitch

 
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Mon, 09-22-2003 - 1:43pm
I can't live without my big yellow can of Coleman's! I use a little in vinaigrette to add bite and also to help emulsify the oil and vinegar. I use it as a dry rub on roast beef, and it makes great hot Chinese style mustard!

Elaine


Elaine