100% Durum Wheat Semolina Pasta Vs......

Avatar for ladibbug
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-01-2003
100% Durum Wheat Semolina Pasta Vs......
6
Thu, 08-21-2003 - 7:36pm
Hi Everyone:

Newbie here, I'm Teri in Northern California...first time on an iVillage Food Board, but I'm a longtime iVillage book board regular and a cl on the iVillage ABC board (Authors, Books & Conversations).

Here's my question: When buying pasta, I look for "100% duram wheat semolina" on the label (learned that on the Food TV Network, their advice for getting the best tasting pasta). I can really tell a difference in quality now and I always spend more $$$ on the "good stuff".

When the label says "100% semolina" on the label, is that the same quality / same thing as "100% duram wheat semolina"??? What about "100% duram semolina"?

Thanks a million...wow, I'm definitely gonna come back and catch up on some of these yummy posts!

Teri

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-23-2003
Thu, 08-21-2003 - 9:14pm
I have no idea, but I did find the following on a search:

*Pasta means food made from flour, for example spaghetti and macaroni. Duram wheat has a lot of protein and gives a great texture. In Italy there is a law that all the pasta has to be made from duram wheat.

That's all I have. Sorry I couldn't be more help.

Tracy

TracyPalmPoster.jpg picture by cl-daisy526
Avatar for cl_daisy526
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-19-2003
Fri, 08-22-2003 - 11:46am
Well, welcome to the board! I have to admit that you've got me on this one too...

Here's what I found:

Semolina is the coarsely ground endosperm of durum, a hard spring wheat with a high-gluten content and golden color. It is hard, granular and resembles sugar. Semolina is usually enriched and is used to make couscous and pasta products such as spaghetti, vermicelli, macaroni and lasagna noodles. Except for some specialty products, breads are seldom made with semolina.

Durum flour is finely ground semolina. It is usually enriched and used to make noodles.


BabyFoot.jpg picture by cl-daisy526

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Sat, 08-23-2003 - 6:27pm
Hi and welcome Teri -

I just love ANY pasta!(lol)

Have you ever tried Whole Wheat Pasta? I used to get a WONDERFUL whole wheat spaghetti and it made the others taste like rubber in comparison. Unfortunately, my store doesn't carry it anymore...I'll have to look around as it really "felt" better to me. Oh, it also made me feel full faster....something that is a "good thing" in my book!(vbg)

~~tracy

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-18-2003
Mon, 08-25-2003 - 5:06pm
Hi, Teri! So nice of you to drop by.

Durum is a hard wheat that yields both flour and semolina. Semolina is the meal, the coarsely ground by-product of making the fine flour from the durum wheat.

The name comes from the Latin "simila" and ancient Assyrian word "samidu," both meaning fine flour meal. When I lived in the Middle East and Europe, semolina was used to make many forms of pasta and flour products, like "brik," a very fine pastry sheet resembling phyllo.

Italian durum semolina is regarded as the best for pasta flour; and, since they've been making pasta since the times of Ancient Rome (the grain bowl was Tunisia), they would know, LOL!

Hope this helps,

Alysia :-)

P.S. I make homemade pasta and always use semolina pasta flour.

Avatar for ladibbug
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-01-2003
Wed, 08-27-2003 - 5:28pm
Hi Stracy:

Thanks for the reply!

Yes, I've tried whole wheat pasta and enjoyed it. I'm glad you reminded me ... I buy only 100% whole wheat bread for the nutrition value...whole wheat pasta would be one more way to get in more "good food" calories...~~sigh~~ to help offset the inevitable carrot cake or pizza calories!!

Teri

Avatar for ladibbug
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-01-2003
Wed, 08-27-2003 - 5:32pm
cl-Tracy:

Thanks to you and the other gals on the board for the durum wheat info...it helps!

A LAW about what pasta must be made of?!! Cool!!

LOL, I'm not Italian, but the way I love to scarf up pasta...makes me wonder!! I swear, I must have ancient ancestors in Rome or some quaint Italian village!!

Teri