Article about education for the gifted

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Registered: 05-18-2005
Article about education for the gifted
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Tue, 09-25-2012 - 7:28am

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Registered: 04-09-2006
Mon, 10-01-2012 - 7:08pm

I think it probably depends a LOT on where you live.  ds went to high school in a) a low population, low income semi rural state (lots of small towns) and then in a remote area of a large state and to be quite honest, most of the impetus for achievement in both places seemed to come from the kids themselves.  The standout kid with lots of AP classes and also an excellent violinist (not my student)  who took freshman calculus at a semi selective college as a high school senior was driven purely by herself...but her dad was a prof and her mom had a business, so she saw what being a high energy driven person could do for her.  The kid with the $1,400 violin was a "sleeper"...the kind of kid who seems to have a lot of talent in a quiet sort of way, but not much motivation: she went to a pricey selective college and then did graduate work...despite her inability to find even five minutes a week for violin practice.   One of the most talented low achieving students I ever had went to college on a soccer scholarship...sports won out over violin lessons eventually but he played in orchestra through high school.   I can't think of any of my long term students that quit orchestra...but to my knowledge most of the ones that are still playing came from musical families.  The only kids whose parents "pulled the plug" did so for economic reasons...they could not pay for lessons, and when I told the mom to not worry about it, she told me that she didn't want her kids "taking things for granted"...wanted them to know the "value of hard work".  And she is still a very good friend.

Deborah

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Registered: 12-06-2010
Tue, 10-02-2012 - 1:19pm
hmmm...that makes sense, turtletime. I had no idea state universities were only taking straight A students! And with education being so expensive.

A side question - is it possible to get straight A's without being gifted in most high schools? Just wondering about the grading systems.
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Registered: 12-06-2010
Tue, 10-02-2012 - 2:32pm
Wow, things have really changed from the old days when honors was worth an extra .5! Thanks for filling me in!
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Registered: 05-18-2005
Tue, 10-02-2012 - 3:15pm

Ladybug, in our area lots of schools have unweighted grade points.  That is to say, general track is 4.0 for an A, college prep is 4.0 for an A, and honors/AP is 4.0 for an A.  Creates some interesting incentives.

Gwen

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Registered: 05-13-1998
Tue, 10-02-2012 - 5:43pm
As others have said, it's all about weighted classes. What's frustrating, is that it's not uniform. College prep in our area isn't weighted at all in our area. The first 2 years of high school, DD was in advanced/honors everything which MOST schools would weight but hers only weighted AP's. In DD's current school, every grade she gets will be weighted. This is why kids take AP classes and so many of them.... "C's" are 3 points, "B's" are 4 and "A's" are 5 points.

GPA isn't everything. From the college admissions officers I know, they actually like to see "improvement." This is what they say but then you look at their enrollment statistics and wonder how that can actually be.

You'll also find that gifted students aren't typically your 4.0+'s.

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