Gender bias in sciences

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Registered: 08-06-2009
Gender bias in sciences
1
Tue, 09-25-2012 - 10:15am
http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2012/09/14/1211286109.full.pdf Despite efforts to recruit and retain more women, a stark gender disparity persists within academic science. Abundant research has demonstrated gender bias in many demographic groups, but has yet to experimentally investigate whether science faculty exhibit a bias against female students that could contribute to the gender disparity in academic science. In a randomized double-blind study (n = 127), science faculty from research-intensive universities rated the application materials of a student—who was randomly assigned either a male or female name—for a laboratory manager position. Faculty participants rated the male applicant as signifi- cantly more competent and hireable than the (identical) female applicant. These participants also selected a higher starting salary and offered more career mentoring to the male applicant. The gender of the faculty participants did not affect responses, such that female and male faculty were equally likely to exhibit bias against the female student. Mediation analyses indicated that the female student was less likely to be hired because she was viewed as less competent. We also assessed faculty participants’ preexist- ing subtle bias against women using a standard instrument and found that preexisting subtle bias against women played a moder- ating role, such that subtle bias against women was associated with less support for the female student, but was unrelated to reactions to the male student. These results suggest that interven- tions addressing faculty gender bias might advance the goal of increasing the participation of women in science. Here is how Finland keeps this from happening. http://www.stm.fi/en/gender_equality/gender_glasses
Avatar for suzyk2118
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-30-1997
Tue, 09-25-2012 - 12:58pm
Being a scientist/engineer in industry, I'd say it's no different there.