Need some support

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-01-2007
Need some support
8
Wed, 10-03-2012 - 11:55am

Hello, I just wanted to do a little  venting, so I hope everyone can bear with me...it's just that I'm so very frustrated and depressed about the direction of my job search. I recently graduated from a highly-skilled program 3 months ago but have been seriously looking for work for the past month. I know this seems like a short amount of time, especially in this ecomony, but many of my classmates have already found jobs and I just feel so stagnant. Part of the reason is that I'm a new grad and that's something I can't change. So I barely get offered interviews in the first place and when I do, I then face my biggest problem...I come off as really disconnected in interviews. It may be a combination of nerves and just having a stoic/introverted personality. I end up sounding awkward/unconfident and disinterested as I stumble to keep conversation going. Today I had quite a bad one. It was everything I just mentioned. So basically I'm just depressed by my lack of responses even though I've become obessesive about my job search to the point of exhaustion and also by the string of bad interviews. Thanks for reading. Any advice or supportive words is appreciated.    

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-22-2012
Fri, 11-23-2012 - 8:10pm
You probably got a job by now. All you needed was a week off of interviewing due to stress. Interviewing could be tiresome and monotonous.
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-01-2007
Mon, 10-08-2012 - 2:10pm

Okay, my original post was somewhat of a rant, so all the negativity you sense was indeed very much present and very much on purpose. I wasn't trying to hide or "sugar coat" my feelings. I just had a not so great interview (partly due to personal reasons) and wasn't feeling too great.  And I have been proactive in seeking job prospects, but I do admit I should be seeking out more networking opportunities. Even though I don't agree with your implication that I might not be devoting as much effort to my job search as I should have, you have given me some food for thought in how I should approach some future endevors.

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-16-2008
Mon, 10-08-2012 - 10:45am

I am not going to coat the following suggestion in sugar, as you are an adult:

1.  Some of the negativity and passivity are coming across even in these post.  I keep reading:  I cannot do this, I am hesitant to do that, etc.  I think some of that probably came across in the interviews as well.  While nobody is suggesting that you should perform open-heart surgery unsupervised, but if you cannot do this or that, offer an alternative.  For example:  I cannot do this alone but if I can work with someone with that expertise, I am sure by the end of the week/month I will be able to do so without problem.  Meanwhile, I am very good at _____  and _____ and can start doing those right away.

2.  In this economy, most people need to be more aggressive (or show more enthusiasm) in order to get a job.  You don't have the luxury to be in a funk.  Start calling people who supervised you at those hospitals/medical offices where you did your rotation and ask if they know anyone in the facilities in your area!  Ask for recommendations.  Call your instructors in school.  Many seasoned professionals have networks all over the country (world) and would not hesitate recommending a deserving candidate to their colleagues.

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-01-2007
Wed, 10-03-2012 - 6:44pm

Yes, we had a clinical rotation component for 1 year at various hospitals/medical offices. But unfortunately, most of my sites are in locations that I cannot travel to now that I graduated and I have no internal connections to the hospitals I'm applying to now. 

Community Leader
Registered: 03-18-1999
Wed, 10-03-2012 - 6:33pm

mappi2007 - 

I am curious about your actual degree or profession. I was in the medical/healthcare field for over 25 years and most of those professions have some kind of internship or practicum that had to be completed as part of the degree. That is how I got my foot in the door for my first position 6 months before I actually graduated. Did you not have this in your program?

 

 

Community Leader - Women At Work Board
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-01-2007
Wed, 10-03-2012 - 6:08pm

Thanks for the responses. Actually, I'm a new grad in the medical field so I'm hesitant to apply my skills without some true on the job training. Experience is somewhat necessary for my job, which is why is also so hard to find places willing to train new grads. But I think you're right in that I need to start interacting with people in a positive way, but it's been hard since I've been in this funk. And I wish I had more contacts in the geographic area I want to work in, but most of my school training was done in an area that is too far for me to commute now that I graduated. I'm thinking perhaps if I still have a lack of responses in a few weeks, I might have to broaden my search. It's just hard to stay mentally ethusiastic, but thanks for your kind support.

Avatar for CMEvelyn
iVillage Member
Registered: 05-29-2012
Wed, 10-03-2012 - 2:28pm
Hi mappi, and welcome to the board! I totally understand, I suck at interviews big time. What demontespan said is good advice, and it will also give you experience, and connections, who might be looking for someone, or might know someone who's looking for someone. Make sure you let everyone know you're looking for work. Interviews are much easier when you already have a foot in the door, so to speak. Also, if you Google interview tips or interview questions, you'll find tons of advice to help you in interviews. Good luck and keep us posted!
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-16-2008
Wed, 10-03-2012 - 1:53pm

Could you use your new skills in a volunteer capacity?  Perhaps a day or tow a week could give you a chance to practice your newly learned skills and some interaction with people; both of which could make you come across as more confident and at ease in future interviews.