ideas?

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-14-2011
ideas?
6
Wed, 10-10-2012 - 2:25pm

Could you give me an idea of what your basic schedule for 2nd grade would look like?  I have tried setting it up like 'school' with a half hour for each subject so my daughter doesn't get stuck on the same subject for a long period.  Whatever she doesn't finish becomes 'homework' which means it's done in the afternoon when she would normally have free time.  This is not working.  Letting her work at her own pace isn't working either b/c she isn't very motivated.  Not sure what to do.  We haven't had the time to do history or science for the past few weeks b/c we are both getting burnt out on the normal school subjects.  I am very tempted to change things up drastically and see how that works.  So do history and science (b/c they are hands on activity based) first each day.  Then have her read to herself for a half hour and either act out or tell me what happened.  Then do flashcards for math.  Math and reading are the major subjects she has 'stalled out' on.  Any suggestions are welcome.

Avatar for vegiemama
Community Leader
Registered: 01-06-2000
In reply to: mamamoseley
Wed, 10-10-2012 - 5:56pm

I would go with your gut instinct, to change things up.  In fact, let her choose sometimes what she'd like to do next...or let her draw the subjects out of a hat, etc.  

Also, take the time to look at the materials you're using.  Maybe her reading and math curricula aren't a very good match for her learning style, and that can evidence itself with just what you're seeing.

If she previously attended school, have you taken the time to deschool and let her decompress from her experiences there?  Were math and reading something she had issues with in school?  If so, then definitely decompress those subjects for sure.

There was something else I was going to suggest but it's flown out of my hsing momma's peabrain, so hopefully someone else will include it in their reply, LOL.


Sue
Homeschooling mom to DD15 & DS11

CL of Homeschooling, Signature Showcase, Ectopic Loss, and Fertility Charting

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-05-2000
In reply to: mamamoseley
Thu, 10-11-2012 - 10:49am

Our basic schedule went something like this:  breakfast and morning chores; math and language arts (the 3 Rs); morning break (snack and recess); history and science (history 3 days/science 2days); lunch; take a walk; listen to music for rest time; play with friends when they got home from school; dinner; quiet play; bed.  We only did academics in the morning.  Whatever didn't get finished was continued the next day or time we had that subject unless they wanted to continue the project after lunch.

Most of the school work was done through unit studies and hands on projects.  Not textbooks.  What textbooks I had were for me for reference, ideas, and timelines.  My oldest loved workbooks so she used them.  The other 2 didn't; they used maniplitives for math, lined and unlined paper for language arts, dictating to me, and learning t hrough art.  We got books from the library and I read to all 3 of them.  math and LA were taught separately.  History (social studies) and science were taught together with the "homework" age and ability appropiate to each child.

Chris

The truth may be out there but lies are in your head. Terry Pratchett

Avatar for vegiemama
Community Leader
Registered: 01-06-2000
In reply to: mamamoseley
Thu, 10-11-2012 - 1:02pm

Keep in mind, too, that learning at home does not need to take as long as learning in a classroom setting.  So much time is wasted in a normal school day.  You can spend 1.5-2 quality hours with your child at home and you'll have accomplished more than the kids who were in school all day.  (Why do you think they come home with piles of homework???)  Your dd may be burning out on work if you're expecting "school" at home to take the same amount of time as classroom school.


Sue
Homeschooling mom to DD15 & DS11

CL of Homeschooling, Signature Showcase, Ectopic Loss, and Fertility Charting

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-09-2006
In reply to: mamamoseley
Fri, 10-12-2012 - 5:38pm
We do "interest led learning"...and are comfortable with the idea of "delayed academics", waiting until kids are developmentally ready before introducing/pursuing some kinds of tasks (reading, computational math). It can be a harder path at the beginning because other kids seem "ahead", but as the mom of a 21 year old who had a fairly traditional scope/sequence, an 18 year old who had that in the beginning, and a 14 year old who had very little structure, the child with the most creativity, initiative, work ethic...the one who values academics the most is the one who had the least externally imposed structure.

Deborah