ID Chips to Track Students at School?

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-13-2007
ID Chips to Track Students at School?
21
Thu, 10-11-2012 - 12:10pm

The Student Locator Project, which launched on Oct 1. at a San Antonio high school and middle school and could be extended to as many as 112 schools, tracks student whereabouts using embedded RFID (radio-frequency identification) chips on student ID badges.

PC World reports:

"Unlike passive chips that transmit data only when scanned by a reader, these chips have batteries and broadcast a constant signal so they can track students' exact locations on school property, down to where they're sitting -- whether it's at a desk, in a counselor's office, or on the toilet."

http://living.msn.com/family-parenting/school-uses-id-chips-to-track-student-locations-1

 

I think I'd have a fit if one of my children were required to wear such a thing.  It just seems way over the top (not to mention a huge waste of money, imo).   What do you think about it?

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iVillage Member
Registered: 04-16-2009
Thu, 10-11-2012 - 2:55pm
That is not considered an invasion of privacy in the States? If it is not, it should be. Talk about the nanny state..
iVillage Member
Registered: 08-22-2009
Thu, 10-11-2012 - 4:20pm

 I don't see a problem with it. 

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Community Leader
Registered: 01-25-2010
Thu, 10-11-2012 - 4:35pm

It is very dangerous.  One there is no reason for this kind of survellance.  2nd where will it end?  Your employer might reason that bathroom breaks are too long. 

chaika

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-18-2006
Thu, 10-11-2012 - 5:51pm

For the general student population, no. For non-verbal children like my daughter, I'd be fine with it.

Angie

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-16-2009
Fri, 10-12-2012 - 11:46am
For special needs children, for which safety is a concern, I could see the benefits. But for the average child, it is treating students like commodities, not like people.
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-16-2009
Fri, 10-12-2012 - 12:01pm
"""The district says the program is necessary to improve safety and track the number of students who attend the schools, which reportedly have high truancy rates. MySanAntonio.com reports the pilot program will cost about $525,000 and another $136,000 a year to operate.""" Gee, maybe they should use that money to improve their educational programs ( introduce more relevant programs,)to combat truancy.
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-18-2006
Fri, 10-12-2012 - 4:41pm

<<<That's a good point, but it's a different issue. In the case of kids with special needs, it's a helpful tool to protect them. In the case of typical kids, it's a way of finding who needs to be punished.>>>

I agree - I don't think it's appropriate for typical kids, and think that all that money could be much better spent elsewhere.

Angie

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-17-2003
Sat, 10-13-2012 - 9:53am

I don't see a problem with it, especially if truancy is a problem.

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-27-2001
Sat, 10-13-2012 - 2:34pm

I think as long as there are certain parameters it is appropriate.  The students should not be required - or even encouraged - to wear such badges outside of school hours.  While on school time, the school is 100% responsible for the children's safety.  If they wander off-campus, if they're cutting class, if they're smoking or having sex in some back closet, it's the school's job to make sure they know where they are.

Also, schools in my state have frequent safety drills including fire drills, evacuation drills, bomb scare drills, active shooter drills, and lockdowns.  This technology would be enormously helpful in the case of a real emergency to insure that every child was accounted for.  

Outside of school?  Absolutely not.  It should be disabled and not travel with the child, who is now their parent's responsibility, and what they do is none of the school's business.

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-16-2009
Sun, 10-14-2012 - 2:44pm
Perhaps you need to take a page from our book. According to the latest stats, we have slashed our drop out rate in the last 20 years. The province with the highest dropout rate (20 to 24 year olds without a high school diploma) is Quebec and that is only 11%. Ontario is at 7.8%. We do it without tracking kids. Build more schools so you have smaller high schools, steam line & standardize your curriculum across each state and the country, provide more funding and not less for schools at risk, provide sex education starting at a young age (we start in grade 1 with age appropriate material) etc.. We are not prefect; we are still working on it. But I don't think tracking kids like cattle will help. You may force kids to sit in class but graduate, I doubt it.

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