Have many questions: hypotonia, expressive language delay, motor delays, attention issue and pica

Visitor (not verified)
anonymous user
Registered: 12-31-1969
Have many questions: hypotonia, expressive language delay, motor delays, attention issue and pica
1
Sat, 10-13-2012 - 6:20pm

Hi.  I have a 5 year old who was just diagnosed with hypotonia.  We noticed the speech and fine/gross motor delays earlier, but was told she would grow out of them.  She is now having difficulties in school, including pica (eating inedible objects).  We think/hope the pica is just a reaction to going to kindergarten.  I have been told that she will grow out of everything by all of her doctors until now.  The new doctor has her going to OT/PT and speech.  We are also thinking about adding ABA if the pica does not stop with the OT and speech.  She had recieved a year of speech prior to now and now you can understand her pretty well.  Her speech issue now is more of an expressive language delay as she just can't seem to get the words out and either takes a break or chooses an easier sentence.  Cognitively, she is more than fine, on a recent assessment she did better then all of the kids in her class by a lot.  This would be wonderful, except she can't pay attention during class and is probably going to repeat kindergarten if things don't change (when I say can't pay attention, I mean she does not attend to the activities in the class at all.  She gets a sticker if she attends to 1 activity and she is sorely lacking stickers).  I would say she is bored, but it is more than that.  She is pretty small (32lbs) and short.  Our other daughter is off the charts in height.  We are taking her for a brain MRI to see if she possibly suffered either a small stroke or lack of oxygen during birth.  When she was born her heart rate plummeted and she had her cord twice around her neck and 1/2 way around her body.     Our older daughter has high functioning autism and my little one has no traits that are similar at all.  The doctor agrees that it is not autism.  I want to know what it is.  The doctor says she is "interesting" and asked what ideas I had.  I really don't know.  The only thing that I could find to relate to her was Prader-Willi, but she is not really focused on food.  She does resemble the pictures of children with Prader-Willi, so much that many of them could be her sibling no question asked, but that may just be the hypotonia.  If anyone has any ideas I could talk to the doctor about, I would really appreciate it.

Thank you for letting me ramble and get this all out!

Kerri