new here...starting to plan kitchen reno

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-04-2007
new here...starting to plan kitchen reno
13
Thu, 01-31-2008 - 9:48pm

After living in this house for 17 years, we are FINALLY getting around to re-doing our kitchen, which has the original cabinets and built-in oven (about 44 years old!!).

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iVillage Member
Registered: 04-11-2006
Fri, 02-01-2008 - 1:30am

The internet is GREAT! We just redid our whole kitchen. We just re-faced our cabinets though. you can see the post below for pictures. We used the website www.refacedepot.com

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-05-2003
Fri, 02-01-2008 - 6:12am

Hi, pemn411! Welcome to Remodel & Renovate, Kitchen Renovations department! We are glad you stopped by!

I agree with maggiewilliams123 on both counts: we had cabinets refaced when we lived in Houston and it was a significant savings. You wold never have known they weren't brand new and while we were at it, we were ale to "tweak" the existing arrangement to make it more to our needs...

Also, do take advantage of the services offered by the big box stores... A little professional advice on layout can be great place to start from. After all, you won't HAVE to take it!

Also, if you are redoing the entire kitchen (you mentioned an "antique" built-in oven), it wold be a good idea to have the appliances you want picked out, measurements and special requirements (ventilation, new power points, etc.) in hand BEFORE you start laying out cabinetry. You'd be surprised at how much dimensions of things like stoves, ovens and refrigerators have changed - we put in a new double over/microwave unit in that Houston kitchen and it required a major rebuild of that cabinet unit to accommodate the few inches difference in size! You CAN get appliances that will fit into the old slots (assuming you want to keep things in the same places, that is), you may NOT want to make the compromises that those models may require.

If you have a contractor that you trust, you could use him/her to help you find cabinets as well. Our contractor has resources available to him that we simply don't have --- and he has been a gem of a resource when we get started on a project here. He brings us brochures, talks over the pros and cons, and even works with the supplier (when the supplier does the installation).

Congratulations on started your modernization. Please keep us posted on your progress!



Co-CL for "The Stitcher's Niche" and "Remodel & Renovate" and CL for "Antiques and Collectibles"






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Stitchery WIPs: "Bath 5¢", "Walking to Town", a selection of 8 San Man snowman charts, "Millenium Sampler", 2 sets of curtain tie-backs using a DMC freebie chart and the DMC linen threads, a Kooler Design Studio chart form JanLynn called "Needlework Shop", "Tsunami Charity Sampler" from the fall 2007 Sampler & Needlework Quarterly, and "Autumn Leaves" from the December 2006 New Stitches



CL for

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-04-2007
Fri, 02-01-2008 - 1:06pm

Hi Maggie and Carol,


Thanks for your responses! I wish we could simply reface our cabinets, but the innards just aren't working for us, and we need to get a new

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-11-2006
Fri, 02-01-2008 - 2:17pm

Well, i wish could be of better help to you, sorry.


I actually don't know of anyone personally that used home depot to do a kitchen remodel, so i don't know whether they are good or not. But I know we live in a smaller town and there are kitchen places here. Like places that just do kitchen remodels. When we were redoing our kitchen in our last house we had them come to give us an estimate on formicah counters (which we ended up not doing formicah anyway) but they just came and gave us a free estimate. Maybe you might have a couple companies in your town that might do designs for cabinets, even if you pay for the design.


That really does seem silly that they wouldn't even have you pay for a design. And I would be uncomfortable committing to a job that will cost thousands of dollars right off the bat too. You won't even know if you like what they are offering and you have to commit to use them?? that doesn't seem very fair. But I've never gotten all NEW cabinets before so maybe that is just the way it works...doesn't seem right though.


anyway, good luck. send some pictures our way when you're on your way.


iVillage Member
Registered: 08-04-2007
Fri, 02-01-2008 - 2:51pm
Oh gosh, you HAVE been helpful! I am truly grateful to just hear about different ideas. Refacing is one I should perhaps give some consideration to.
iVillage Member
Registered: 09-05-2003
Fri, 02-01-2008 - 2:51pm

Well, re tweaking, we stuck with the existing floor plan (there was an island which wasn't very convenient -- opening the oven door meant passage was limited) but otherwise...

This kitchen had a small eat-in space which we didn't use and a dark and dingy porch. We had the porch "enclosed", using the existing roof as the wall line and added widows that "looked" like French doors so there was no fuss and muss from the HOA (who had approval rights over modifications to the exterior). The floors had to be leveled between the old kitchen floor and the new "space" and the old living room slider to the porch was turned into a pocket door. We had parquet floors installed on the newly level floors, and extended this to the utility room behind the kitchen where we converted a "closet" to a pantry... and rewired that part of the house so the fuses wouldn't blow each time the drier was used!

Now, cabinets: they were painted white, flat doors. But solid wood. We had them faced with winter white formica and instead of hardware, used light oak borders as handles (the oak matched the floor). because we bough a new fridge *and* a double oven/microwave, we had two of the cabinets and one set of drawers "cut open" and redesigned to accommodate these appliances. We also put in a new dishwasher, a new trash compactor and a new double stainless sink. Basically this means we lost some cabinet space but since we had the pantry closet where we could store seldom-used items, we really didn't lose storage space.

The island we also had refaced and it was where the smooth top rangetop was placed. We really wanted a gas top and grill like a Jennaire but there was no way to vent it (the island was too far from the walls to install a vent to the outside, even one of those raise up kind that Jennaire had behind their grills.).

Opposite the island was a passthrough to the living room - more refacing and new faucet and the like in the little bar sink in it. We put bar stool on the living room side...

At teh sime time, we had the outside brick repointed and bad bricks replaced, and we had the master bath totally redone (marble floors and vanity sinks, new toilet, new faucets, new shower enclosure --- everything except the tub, which would have meant removing a wall!), so this was a mixed bag remodel.

WEw hired an architect and a contractor (a really GOOD contractor, it turned out) and we took out a second on the house (which we paid back in two years) for $25,000 (this was back in 1991) to cover the entire thing.

One thing we wished we had done was the countertops (we left the not-bad-condition formica tops in place) but that price was so far beyond what the kitchen was worth. If we had been doing kitchen alone we probably would have gutted it and started from scratch...

Gosh, living in Houston (summer, an open room to the hot and humid and often rainy elements for about 3 months, people tracking through the house at both ends (kitchen and bath on opposite sides of the house), the dust, the noise, the lack of privacy! Well, we had done it once before (we put on a 900 sq ft two-story addition and partial kitchen redo in our previous CA house) so we knew we could stand it. The only hassle was making sure contractors didn't let our indoor cats out... especially since one was a major run-for-it-when-she-could cat... but our General Contractor was a gem and he managed things wonderfully, and the architect was a great go-between between contractor and building inspectors...

I have to say, we are big on a good GC and in majors like that, architects. They made getting permits and inspections SO much easier, especially as we were both working full time (DH had a job with a lot of traveling so he was also gone a lot, and my job was teaching at a community college which often meant early days, late nights and weekends) when all this was going on...

Wow, I rambled on didn't I. Oh well, I hope the answer is in here somewhere! LOL



Co-CL for "The Stitcher's Niche" and "Remodel & Renovate" and CL for "Antiques and Collectibles"






Visit me at That Yank In...
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Stitchery WIPs: "Bath 5¢", "Walking to Town", a selection of 8 San Man snowman charts, "Millenium Sampler", 2 sets of curtain tie-backs using a DMC freebie chart and the DMC linen threads, a Kooler Design Studio chart form JanLynn called "Needlework Shop", "Tsunami Charity Sampler" from the fall 2007 Sampler & Needlework Quarterly, and "Autumn Leaves" from the December 2006 New Stitches



CL for

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-05-2003
Fri, 02-01-2008 - 2:54pm

I agree that that is strange --- I wonder if that is a store-wide policy or just a local one?

Anyway, that is another reason to find a good contractor like the one we have now, who gives us bids after researching options - and we aren't committed to anything. Of course it helps that our currant contractor is a high school classmate and current friend of DH...

And I agree --- check into kitchen "stores"... surely there is at least one near you.



Co-CL for "The Stitcher's Niche" and "Remodel & Renovate" and CL for "Antiques and Collectibles"






Visit me at That Yank In...
and Traveling with That Yank




 





Avatar made with Portrait Illustrator Maker


Stitchery WIPs: "Bath 5¢", "Walking to Town", a selection of 8 San Man snowman charts, "Millenium Sampler", 2 sets of curtain tie-backs using a DMC freebie chart and the DMC linen threads, a Kooler Design Studio chart form JanLynn called "Needlework Shop", "Tsunami Charity Sampler" from the fall 2007 Sampler & Needlework Quarterly, and "Autumn Leaves" from the December 2006 New Stitches



CL for

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-04-2007
Fri, 02-01-2008 - 3:04pm

No, you did not ramble at all! And my goodness, you sure got a lot for your money in 1991! I had hoped to take on a reno of ALMOST that magnitude, but with a budget of about $25K in 2008, I don't think I'll be able to do anything grand. I wanted to relocate our laundry room, which is in the back corner of the kitchen, to the other side of the powder room, which is on the other side of the far wall next to the eat-in area. That would mean encroaching on our family room, but I was willing to do it to get an open kitchen. It would have required some masonry and moving some plumbing around. Plus we definitely would have needed an architect for that. However, I think we decided that contractors would probably laugh their heads off at our budget, and we'd never be able to do that. . Sooo back to square one.


You must have an infinite reservoir of patience to have gone through all that mess and intrusion!


Anyway, as I said earlier, ALL ideas are truly helpful and VERY appreciated!!


I simply have to figure out WHERE to start and GET STARTED!!


iVillage Member
Registered: 09-05-2003
Sat, 02-02-2008 - 6:06am

Well, things were cheap in Houston -- it is entirely possible that some of the workmen (who only spoke Spanish) weren't even legal, I suppose...

I agree though, that we did get a good deal. And we weren't moving plumbing, which really helped. Even in Houston, plumbing is pricey (union work ALWAYS is). Taking out walls is no biggie so long as they aren't supporting walls, and luckily, that back wall we moved out five or six feet apparently wasn't!

And 1991 WAS a long time ago in dollar value terms. We've pent a LOT more than that for our conversion here of a porch to an all-season sunroom --- not a whole lot different in concept from what we did to that Houston porch, without the kitchen upgrades and without a wall removal (we just use the slider that originally went onto the porch as the door to the room).

I guess we do have a lot of patience as we've had contractors in here every year since we moved in: a basement refit, skylights in my "office" (which has the look of an attic conversion to it and had NO windows to speak of), the sunporch, reinsulating the entire roof/ceiling and all the attic walls adjacent to living spaces, the garage walls, a stairway from the garage to the attic, a new fireplace insert inside and major hardscape alterations (terracing the back of the house with stone retaining walls) and a new patio/deck off the back of the house...

DH's mind never stops coming up with more changes, Funny --- we by a house because we like it and we set about changing it. Happens every time!



Co-CL for "The Stitcher's Niche" and "Remodel & Renovate" and CL for "Antiques and Collectibles"






Visit me at That Yank In...
and Traveling with That Yank




 





Avatar made with Portrait Illustrator Maker


Stitchery WIPs: "Bath 5¢", "Walking to Town", a selection of 8 San Man snowman charts, "Millenium Sampler", 2 sets of curtain tie-backs using a DMC freebie chart and the DMC linen threads, a Kooler Design Studio chart form JanLynn called "Needlework Shop", "Tsunami Charity Sampler" from the fall 2007 Sampler & Needlework Quarterly, and "Autumn Leaves" from the December 2006 New Stitches



CL for

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-04-2007
Sat, 02-02-2008 - 8:06am

Wish I could convince my DH of all the things this house needs! But then again, when I consider how long it's taking me to figure out the kitchen, I can see why he's reluctant! :-)


And it sounds like when you buy a house, you see its potential and go for it! It takes vision to do that!

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